Slideshow | Climate change effected in avifaunal destruction: Tribal Foundation (Nagercoil) – Tamil Nadu

Hold a slide for reading by “hovering” (mouse-over on a pc browser), or by touching it with one finger (on a tablet computer or smartphone); to resume the slideshow click/tap the image | More tips >>

Tribal Foundation takes people for visits to the Sanctuary as participatory environmental exposure programs

The Climate Change has its impacts and vibrations in a host of ways as cyclone, hurricane, storms, tsunami, thunderstorm and drought in India. A severe gale and thunderstorm had their impact on the avifauna that were breeding in the trees in the Koonthanlulam Bird Sanctuary in Tamil Nadu, India on April 29, coupled with rain.

The hurricane tossed the trees and many branches were broken resulting in the destruction of the parent birds with the chicks, mainly of Painted Stork. Painted Storks breed in the Sanctuary in the trees of the small agricultural village, where Pelicans, cormorants, Ibises breed in the trees situated inside the lake. If the environmental conditions are favorable as proper rainfall and availability of water in the Koonthankulam Lake and adjoining lakes and ponds from January to June every year water birds breed there. It is estimated that more than 4,000 birds breed in the Sanctuary.

Many species of migratory birds as Ruddy Shell Duck, Bar Headed Goose, Pin Tail Duck, Garganey, Shoveller, Osprey visit the Sanctuary.

Apart from the aquatic birds, ground nesting birds breed in the Sanctuary and Greater Flamingos are also spotted there.

More than 400 birds including parent birds fell to the ground and many of them died with broken limbs and bones. The local community rescued about 80 birds and kept them in a safer place and majority of them survived, but a dozen has to suffer with broken limbs that could not be set right as their nerves were damaged.

Painted Stork is listed by IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature ) in the Near Threatened category with population decreasing trend. Spot billed Pelican is also listed by IUCN and is in the Near Threatened category.

Reacting to the incident in nature, K.Mariappan (72) of the village said that he has not witnessed in his life such a natural calamity, where trees were slashed by severe winds and rain. He said it was an abnormal event in nature.

Tribal Foundation takes people for visits to the Sanctuary as participatory environmental exposure programs.

Courtesy (photos and information) Davidson Sargunam by email (16 July 2019)

More posts contributed by Davidson Sargunam >>

For inquiries on environmental exposure programs, please contact
Davidson Sargunam
Environmental Educationist
M: 09994138550
email: ssdavidson9@gmail.com

Tribal Foundation
23, Cave Street, Duthie School Road
Nagercoil – 629 001
Tamil Nadu
Reg. No: 1116/2009

 

For recent reports on India’s tribal cultural heritage, search select periodicals in the above search window. A list of  periodicals, online journals and portals included in each custom search is found here >>

Research the above issues with the help of Shodhganga: A reservoir of theses from universities all over India, made available under Open Access >>

Related posts

Posted in Ecology and environment, Education and literacy, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Southern region, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on Slideshow | Climate change effected in avifaunal destruction: Tribal Foundation (Nagercoil) – Tamil Nadu

Video | “Dhuri Daka” (Rice made of Dust): Song 7 from Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village) – West Bengal

Dhuri Daka (Rice made of Dust)

[Starting from 5:46]

Theme
A boy tells a girl:
Oh Muni, you may have forgotten the days when we played together under the banyan tree. Playfully we cooked dust as if it were rice and tree-leaves as if they were curry. How we used to catch fish together in the muddy water and pull out lotus-roots from the water to eat. Maybe you no longer remember?
The girl tells the boy:
Remembering our bygone days makes my heart burn, the smile of my child lightens my heart.

Literary translation

Rice made with dust and curry with leaves
Playing around the banyan tree,
Oh Muni, you have forgotten the days
We used to play together.

Catching fish together Muni
Throwing out the lotus roots from the water to eat,
Playing in muddy water
You may not remember now.

Collecting firewood in scorching heat,
Collecting vegetables at noon in the field,
Managing the family makes me tired.

Remembering bygone days
Makes my heart burn,
Smile of my child makes me smile
and my heart light.

View the full video album from the beginning >>

Courtesy: Dr. Boro Baski © Ghosaldanga Bishnubati Adibasi Trust –

Learn more

More posts contributed by Dr. Boro Baski >>

For inquiries on Santal cultural and educational programs, please contact
Dr. Boro Baski
email: borobaski@gmail.com 
M: 094323 57160

Ghosaldanga Bishnubati Adibasi Trust
Registration under Trust Registration Act 1982
P.O. Sattore, Dist. Birbhum
West Bengal-731 236
India

Copyright

All contents are being published with an understanding that the respective copyright owners have agreed to the license terms explained in the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. This means that no commercial use or modification of such content is permissible without written consent by their respective copyright holders.

Related posts

Posted in Childhood and children, Customs, Eastern region, Games and leisure time, Health and nutrition, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Organizations, PDF printfriendly, Resources, Storytelling, Trees, Video contents | Tagged | Comments Off on Video | “Dhuri Daka” (Rice made of Dust): Song 7 from Santali video album “Ale Ato” (Our Village) – West Bengal

Tips | Slideshow navigation and viewing on touch screens

  1. each image is displayed for a few secondes
  2. please be patient, there may be a short delay before the next image appears
  3. hold any slide by “hovering” (by mouse-over on a pc, by touching it with one finger on a tablet computer or smartphone)
  4. to resume/continue the slideshow: click/tap the image
  5. to enlarge and browse the images one by one, first select [Show thumbnails], then click/tap any of the thumbnail images
  6. select [Show slideshow] in order to return to the automatic display mode
Posted in Help, Tips | Comments Off on Tips | Slideshow navigation and viewing on touch screens

Gond tribal dance revived near Pench National Park – Madhya Pradesh

Villagers at Sawra have decided to revive their traditional dances in an effort to preserve and showcase their rich culture. Satpuda Foundation (a wildlife conservation NGO working in central India) is encouraging this and other community initiatives. It is hoped that tourists going to Pench National Park will also visit local villages to understand the tribal traditions of the area.

The video shows one of the dancers’ practice sessions at the village school.

Source: YouTube – ‪Gond tribal dancers near Pench National Park‬‏
Date Visited: Wed Jul 13 2011 09:05:21 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Times of India, 26 November 2016

Tiger population in Pench reserve risen to 53: SFRI report | Read the full report here >>

SEONI: T he number of tigers in the Pench Tiger Reserve here has gone up to 53, according to the latest figures provided by the State Forest Research Institute (SFRI). 

The SFRI has recently informed about the rise in tiger population to the authorities of Pench Tiger Reserve.  […]

Pench national park, known as home to ‘Mowgli’, a fictional character and protagonist in English writer Rudyard Kipling’s ‘The Jungle Book’. […]
The report also studies incidents of human interference in the reserve area and found that it was at negligible level, he added.  […]

The SFRI also released the figures of herbivores in the reserve, which shows that the number of spotted deer, blue bull, sambar (large deer), wild boars, monkeys and bison, too, has increased manifold. 

The reserve is spread in 1,179-square km of area, which includes both core and buffer zones, the director said

Source: Tiger population in Pench reserve risen to 53: SFRI report
URL: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/Tiger-population-in-Pench-reserve-risen-to-53-per-cent-SFRI-report/articleshow/55638763.cms
Date visited: 12 July 2019

Tips

More about Safe Search

Tips for using Safe Search: Free online tools for use by teachers and pupils >>

 

For recent reports on India’s tribal cultural heritage, search select periodicals in the above search window. A list of  periodicals, online journals and portals included in each custom search is found here >>

Research the above issues with the help of Shodhganga: A reservoir of theses from universities all over India, made available under Open Access >>

Related posts

Posted in Anthropology, Central region, Cultural heritage, Eco tourism, Figures, census and other statistics, Maps, Music and dance, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, Performing arts, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Tiger, Tribal elders, Video resources - external | Tagged | Comments Off on Gond tribal dance revived near Pench National Park – Madhya Pradesh

Appropriate education for Adivasi children – the Vidyodaya School model at Gudalur

Success stories from Vidyodaya in Gudalur >>

How the education work began – an introduction

Kadichankolli, 1991 – The first ‘school’ begins in this village. The teacher, Raji, is from the village. The medium of instruction is `Bettakurumba’.  One would wonder what the significance of this is.

The Gudalur Block has as many as eleven residential schools exclusively for the tribals, called Government Tribal Residential schools (GTR Schools). Begun in the 60s, they seem to have started off well with some inspired teachers in the early years. At some point the rot had set in and in the last two decades, hardly anyone has completed schooling from these schools. The damage to the tribals has not been purely from the educational angle, but also cultural.

As it is, like this Kattunayakan boy, adivasi children go to school against heavy odds and after surmounting many obstacles. But, when they first went to the school for admission, the Headmasters straight away denigrated their names and changed them. Most of the adivasi children who have been to school have two names today. In addition to this, they are not allowed to talk in their languages. These five-year-olds would know no other language other than their mother-tongue and this really has very detrimental effect on them. They are also not used to threats and beating, and this really scares them. Therefore, at the first opportunity, they escape from these schools, never to return. […]  we took on one educated tribal youth for each of the schools. This person would be able to liaise between the community and the school, and at the same time take care of the child in the school. We also hoped that the schools would allow them to teach. This had a tremendous impact upon the community and they began to send their children to schools. However, it was not particularly well received by the teachers in the schools, who felt that we were now keeping track of them. […]

This led to the children being treated better in the schools […]  Thus, in 1995, when the Mahasabha – the general meeting of 175 leaders from all the villages to assess the progress made to their lives – met, they decided that everything else had improved in these schools except the education. They felt that the only solution to this problem was to have a school of their own, just like they had a hospital of their own.

This was how the first batch of adivasi children came to Vidyodaya School. Vidyodaya School was a small private school started for the children of some of the staff of ACCORD [Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development started in 1985] and later for some from the local community. By 1995, it was not certain whether it wanted to continue or not, as the children for whom it was started were passing out. At that juncture, the AMS expressed interest in the school and wondered whether this could not become a school for Adivasi children. […]

From a mere 43 students in 1996, we have as many as 2180 children admitted to various government and private schools today (2004-2005).

At Vidyodaya School importance is given not just to academic development of the children; Handicrafts, innovative project work, singing, dancing, drawing, painting and theatre are conducted to bring out the innate creative abilities of the children. Adivasi traditional songs, dances and story-telling are also given great importance. […]

The Trust is permitted to receive funds from foreign sources  […] Indian contributors are exempt under Section 80 G of the income Tax Act.

Address: Viswa Bharati Vidyodaya Trust, Post Box No. 28,Gudalur – 643212, The Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, India

Source: Adivasi.net – Vidyodaya
Address : http://www.adivasi.net/vidyodaya.php
Date Visited: Tue Jul 12 2011 19:58:13 GMT+0200 (CEST)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

 

For recent reports on India’s tribal cultural heritage, search select periodicals in the above search window. A list of  periodicals, online journals and portals included in each custom search is found here >>

Publications on the above issues may be found here (title descriptions and libraries):

Search for an item in libraries near you:
WorldCat.org >>

Related posts

Posted in Accountability, Adivasi, Childhood and children, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Health and nutrition, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Music and dance, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Southern region, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal elders, Tribal identity, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Tagged | Comments Off on Appropriate education for Adivasi children – the Vidyodaya School model at Gudalur