Tips | Celebrating tribal identity: Culture-specific stories – Diversity in children’s books from India

Beyond stereotypes | Read the full story >>

[…] It took some time for [Nagaland-based artist Canato Jimo] to realise that diversity didn’t necessarily mean something that is steeped in cultural symbolism. “I started out by doing the obvious thing — looking at culture-specific stories like folk tales and festivals that were celebrated in Nagaland,” he says. But as he followed online movements advocating for diversity in children’s books, both in India and the West, he understood that “because I was used to reading certain kinds of books about the region I grew up in, my natural instinct was to think in the same direction. Sometimes, without realising it, we tend to stereotype ourselves”.

Source: Children’s books: Northeast in the everyday

URL: https://www.thehindu.com/books/books-authors/childrens-books-northeast-in-the-everyday/article26026048.ece

Date visited: 19 February 2019


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A splendid way of welcoming the new year among the Khamti community: The Buddhist Sangken festival (April) – Arunachal Pradesh

The Sangken festival is celebrated by Khamtis, they are one of the oldest tribes of Lohit District of Arunachal Pradesh. The district is located in the plains of Arunachal Pradesh. The festival is a Buddhist festival celebrated with respect where Buddha is worshipped for the welfare of the mankind. […]

Not only Buddhists, but people from other religious background take part to give a secular feel to the festival. The celebration takes place for three consecutive days when the images of Lord Buddha are given bath ceremoniously. During the celebration the locals make home made sweet and distribute them. The exchange of gifts is also a common trait of the festival.

The main attraction of the festival is splashing clean water, which is the symbol of peace and purity. The images of Buddha are taken out and after the ceremonial bath. The procession is accompanied by drums and enjoyment. This holy bath of lord Buddha is an auspicious event in Arunachal Pradesh. On the final day, the images are taken back to their original place. […]

Not only people from Lohit District but from other district also celebrate the festival. The involvement and participation of the people shows the depth and importance of the occasion among the people of Arunachal Pradesh.

arunachal-pradesh-festivals-screenshot2018

Fairs and Festivals in Arunachal Pradesh

[…] Many of the festivals celebrated in Arunachal Pradesh are closely linked to agriculture, the main occupation of the state. Celebrated on a grand scale, these festivals are characterized by prayers that are later followed by merry making. Among the most popular festivals of Arunachal Pradesh are Ziro Festival of Music , Losar Festival, Tamladu Festival, Sangken Festival. […]

Arunachal Pradesh is home to a good number of tribes. So you can find some festival or the other happening in Arunachal Pradesh at any time of the year. Be a part of the celebrations when you travel to Arunachal Pradesh. For this, just get in touch with us today and we will help you plan a most memorable holiday.

Source: Fairs and Festivals in Arunachal Pradesh
URL: https://www.indianholiday.com/fairs-and-festivals/arunachal-pradesh/sangken-festival.html
Date accessed: 5 September 2018

To find publications released by Indian publishers and government institutions, type the name of a tribal community (e.g. “Khamti”), an Indian State or Union Territory (e.g. “Arunachal Pradesh”), region or any related subjects of interest (e.g. “Himalaya tribal custom”) in the search field seen below:

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Committed to spreading knowledge of India’s tribal and breaking the shackles that have held back tribal folk music: Anahad Foundation – New Delhi

https://www.thebetterindia.com/121371/anahad-tribal-music/

Rinchen Norbu Wangchuk, TheBetterIndia.com, November 17, 2017

Folk music is an indelible part of India’s storied oral tradition. Songs emanating from the tribal folk tradition are critical fragments of this country’s vast cultural diversity. Based on simple instruments and arrangements, articulated by voices of the soil, and set across different geographical locations and cultural contexts, these songs are a celebration of nature and the human condition.

In an era when music is based on electronically-generated soundscapes, a young social entrepreneur, Abhinav Agrawal (26) started the Anahad Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation that works towards recording, preserving, documenting and consolidating the available knowledge of the evolution of Indian tribal folk music. […]

The Anahad Foundation aims to break the shackles that have held back tribal folk music. […]

Although the organisation is based out of New Delhi, the foundation and their team of volunteers travel to tribal villages with a mobile studio recording system to record the work of these artists under their ‘Project Equals’ initiative, which brings tribal folk musical communities into the mainstream. Once the composition is vetted for originality, it is converted into a digital format. The copyright to this composition is then given to the composer. […]

“Either the tribal artist or someone from the community possessing a certain amount of literacy is taught to become artist managers in their own right, providing them with CDs, business cards and pen drives. In the event that they do not understand a particular piece of contract or any such document, we help them overcome communication barriers.” […]

This month the foundation and its band of volunteers are travelling to Punjab, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh and Karnataka for research on tribal folk groups

Find out more about the Anahad Foundation: https://anahad.ngo/


Source: How This Organisation Is Giving India’s Tribal Musicians a New Lease of Life
URL: https://www.thebetterindia.com/121371/anahad-tribal-music/
Date visited: 8 January 2019


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Reviving native ecology as to restore the wealth of the people: Cultural continuity for the twenty-first century – Kerala

Places like Kerala where there were numerous sacred groves and related culture, are ecologically disturbed now due to ill conceived developments chartered out by those who did not have any knowledge or concern about nature/ecology. Modernists could not understand the natural significance of the numerous rituals and myths. The tribal communities had their own thoughts and philosophy about ecological niche, and from their memory the concept of native ecology can be revived. […]

The biodiversity and the indigenous knowledge of the people about numerous varieties of seeds are the wealth of the people.
Local and indigenous knowledge about soil, plants, ecology, water management, ethno zoology, ethno philosophy, ethno education, village games, local archaeology, markets, festivals, local fisheries, toxicology, agriculture, grandma medicine, rain lore, paddy lore, honey lore, sea lore, forest lore, groves, local technologies, food, fruits, ethno music, ethno astronomy, river lore, arts and crafts etc. are now studied. This knowledge is totally different from the recorded written matter, as it lies hidden in many oral traditions. By understanding the ethnicity of every aspect cultural continuity can be traced, since the local knowledge is not “taught” but a “learned and assimilated” one. As this is a multidisciplinary area, present century will have to take immense effort in preserving and documenting it. […]

The villagers and the tribals utilised medicinal plants numbering more than eight thousand, and they practiced many systems of medicine ranging from “Grandma therapy” to sophisticated treatment. The roots of many systems of medicine like Ayurveda, Unani, Sidha can be seen in tribal medicine. Traditional veterinary and Vrikshayurveda [Arboreal Medicine] also developed as a part of their holistic attitude to life.
The grave crisis faced now by the third world countries is connected with the commercialisation of their indigenous knowledge by the so called developed countries and multinational agencies. From the period of colonisation the plundering of knowledge and raw materials of these countries was the aim of the west. Many formulae used in modern medicines are taken from the indigenous knowledge of the tribals of Asia, Africa and countries in South America without even a formal acknowledgement. […]

Source: C.R. Rajagopalan and V.K. Sreedharan in Summer Rain: Harvesting the Indigenous Knowledge of Kerala, pp. 15-16 & p. 93-94

Vrksayurveda is a giant work consisting of twelve chapters. […] The first chapter mainly deals with the classification of the soil. It is divided into classes according to fertility and the accessibility of water. […]
Just as the blood vessels carry the blood through the surface and internal parts of the body, so also there are various fountains of water in the upper and lower layers of the earth. – C.K. Ramachanran, Vrikshayurveda (1984)

VRIKSHAYURVEDA (Arboreal Medicine in Ancient India)
C.K. Ramachanran
This paper discusses the special branch of the Ancient Indian science on plant life as depicted by Vrikshayurveda, and the obvious relevance of the insights these provide to enrich our knowledge and practice in this field
ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the special branch of the Ancient Indian science on plant life as depicted by Vrikshayurveda, and the obvious relevance of the insights these provide to enrich our knowledge and practice in this field.
Download or view the Full Text of this article (PDF, 44K) >>

Also read: Mapping indigenous memories with a holistic understanding of the living planet: “Summer Rain” – Kerala >>

Source: Ancient Science of Life, Vol. IV, No.2 October 1984, Page 110-111 VRIKSHAYURVEDA (Arboreal Medicine in Ancient India) C.K. RAMACHANRAN, Chinganezhath House, Mavoor Road, Calicut – 673001
URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3331496/pdf/ASL-4-110.pdf
Date visited: 23 July 2018

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Research the above issues with the help of Shodhganga: A reservoir of theses from universities all over India, made available under Open Access >>

Posted in Colonial policies, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, ePub, Ethnobotany, Globalization, Health and nutrition, History, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Organizations, PDF printfriendly, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sacred grove, Southern region, Storytelling, Tagore and rural culture, Trees, Tribal culture worldwide, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on Reviving native ecology as to restore the wealth of the people: Cultural continuity for the twenty-first century – Kerala