Workshop on Banam Making: Appreciation for the ancient musical string instrument of the Santals – West Bengal

banams-boro-baski-workshop

1st Phase-Workshop on Banam Making
(One of the ancient musical instruments of the Santals)

Date & Time: 18-19 August 2018, from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
Venue:  Museum of Santal Culture, Bishnubati, Birbhum

Organized by Ghosaldanga Bishnubati Adibasi Trust, Birbhum, West Bengal and funded by Museum of Cultural History, Oslo, Norway

CONCEPT NOTE

The Banam (single-string wooden lute or fiddle) is one of the ancient musical instruments of the Santal tribe.  The instrument is made of wood; the lower part is covered with cow-hide and tightened with bamboo pegs. According to its different types, shapes and sizes the Banam has different names and creates various tunes. Banam-Making is an art, and not many people among the Santals are engaged in pursuing it. | Learn more (PDF with contact details, 155 KB) Banam workshop programme Boro Baski 14-8-18>> 

Source: courtesy Dr. Boro Baski (email 14 August 2018)

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ePub | Free catalogue: Museum of Santal Culture (Bishnubati) – West Bengal

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Posted in Crafts and visual arts, Customs, Eastern region, Education and literacy, ePub, Maps, Music and dance, Names and communities, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Tribal elders, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Workshop on Banam Making: Appreciation for the ancient musical string instrument of the Santals – West Bengal

The Adivasi Script Movement in Orissa and Jharkhand: Identity, Education and Cultural Revitalization – “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi

Abstract 11: Adivasi Script Movement: Identity, Education and Cultural Revitalization

Paper presented for “Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative” (National Conference) – New Delhi

GOMATI BODRA HEMBROM

Department of Sociology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi

KEYWORDS: ADIVASIS, PRE-LITERATE, SCRIPT, CULTURE, IDENTITY

Writing came to India much earlier than other civilizations – from the days of the Indus Valley Civilization, by over four thousand years ago and the space has also witnessed emergence of some of the great writing systems.  On the other hand, Adivasi languages of India represent valuable relics of the country’s past cultural heritage in the form of oral traditions and folklore. These are indigenous societies without any writing system, hence also considered as pre-literate societies.  Even without a writing system they have survived and also have a rich culture and traditions regarding every aspects of life. But in the past few decades there has been a significant change in the lives of tribal communities. One of it is related to tribal languages, that is creation of a script by the Adivasis themselves. This script movement among Adivasis has been considered as a mark of social and cultural mobility. As most of these tribal communities, since the colonial period, came under direct contact with the majoritarian dominant groups which led to constant subjugation and exploitation of the former.  

This paper intends to do a sociological analysis of the script movement among the Adivasis in the state of Orissa and Jharkhand. It will also examine how THE script movement is also related to the institution of education, identity question and cultural revitalization. This paper is based on secondary data, case studies and personal observation.

BIONOTE: Dr. Gomati Bodra Hembrom is currently employed as Assistant Professor at the Department of Sociology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. She may be contacted at the email ID:  gomatibodra@yahoo.co.in

Source: Book of Abstracts for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative organised by The Department of English & Outreach Programme Jamia Millia Islamia (New Delhi, 27-28 February 2017)

Courtesy Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 4 October 2017)

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Audio | The Muskoka Summit on the Environment – Canada

Restoring our relationship with nature from lake beds to treetops

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The Right to Information Act (RTI): Legislation that empowers citizens to prevent illegitimate concentrations of power

The basic object of the Right to Information Act is to empower the citizens, promote transparency and accountability in the working of the Government, contain corruption, and make our democracy work for the people in real sense. It goes without saying that an informed citizen is better equipped to keep necessary vigil on the instruments of governance and make the government more accountable to the governed. –  Government of India | Learn more >>

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A constitution which guarantees: “The State shall not discriminate against any citizen” – The Sovereign Republic of India

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An inspiration to many young girls from the Koya tribe: Jayanti Buruda, “the first female voice from the tribe to enter the mainstream media” –  Odisha

Jayanti Buruda

Lakshmi Karunakaran, thebetterindia.com, February 12, 2018 | Read the full story >>

Girls among the Koya tribe have a staggeringly low literacy level. “Girls hardly go to school, the literacy rate among girls is below 15 percent,” she adds. With little infrastructure for education and a strong tradition of early marriages within the community, most girls are bereft of any formal education. However, encouraged by their father, Jayanti and her four sisters have been educated. “Ours is the first educated family in the tribe in Malkhangiri,” she says. Her sister, in fact, is the first graduate of the community.

Jayanti currently works with Kalinga TV and reports from Malkangiri. Malkangiri is known as one of the most Naxalite-affected areas of Odisha. It also became home to Bangladeshi refugees who were rehabilitated from 1965 under the Dandakaranya Project. In the early 90s, thanks to the LTTE, Sri Lankan Tamil refugees were also rehabilitated here.

Jayanti’s dream to become a journalist has come true, but she still faces several challenges on the ground. “Being the only woman journalist on the field in Malkangiri is difficult. There is a lot of gender discrimination. Male colleagues seldom take me or my work seriously. I need to fight at every step” […]

Apart from being a journalist Jayanti also runs her NGO that focuses on education, especially for girls from her tribal community.

Source: Meet the First Female Journalist of a Community Where Girls Hardly Go to School
URL: https://www.thebetterindia.com/130765/koya-tribe-odisha-female-journalist/
Date accessed: 16 June 2018 

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