Bhimayana, an award winning graphic novel on Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar illustrated by Gond artists: Storytelling at its very best

Bhimayana: Experiences of Untouchability. Graphic novelon Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar with art by award winning Gond artists Durgabai Vyam and Subhas Vyam; story by Srividya Natarajan and S. Anand. Navayana Publishing 2011. ISBN-13: 978-8189059170. Rs. 325  | WorldCat.org >>

A must-read for every child and adult in the nation and a must-include in every school’s curriculum. – Sowmya Sivakumar, The Hindu (Literary Review), May 1, 2011

This year, Delhi University chucked Gone with the Wind and James Bond from its optional paper (now compulsory) on popular literature in the English undergraduate course, and included Bhimayana, a book on some of the experiences of BR Ambedkar’s early life. Probably the first graphic book to be incorporated into the syllabus of any Indian university, it has, however, raised a few questions on the way Ambedkar has made an entry into the realm of ‘popular’ culture even as he remains a diminished figure in the life of our nation, fixated as it is on Gandhi, Nehru and Patel.

So, would the inclusion of Bhimayana count as a progressive move? Its inclusion in the new syllabus has more to do with making a gesture towards Ambedkar; an attempt to “give Dalits their due”, than about a re-positioning of Ambedkar and his politics in history, say some Delhi University teachers.

Paramita Ghosh, Hindustan Times, New Delhi, Apr 14, 2014
Since January 2014, Bhimayana is being taught in classrooms. “Ambedkar is not just the answer to a quiz question. He was more than the drafter of the Constitution” […]

Source: Gone with the Wind, James Bond make way for Ambedkar in Delhi University | india | Hindustan Times
Address: http://www.hindustantimes.com/india/gone-with-the-wind-james-bond-make-way-for-ambedkar-in-delhi-university/story-AnTHqHNhrfnCRzwM1J56KI.html
Date visited: 18 September 2019

I want to say something about the way this extraordinary book tells its story. […]

The imagined theatre has been destroyed by so-called Communication Experts, the media, politicians without a future, and a global economic system which reduces the whole of History and every horizon of life to the pursuit of profit. On the site of the stage there is today a Shopping Mall.

Yet, in fact, History continues and the struggle persists. And so we face the challenge of how to tell stories about them across the world today.

This book offers a prophetic answer and it is this: replace the stage of History with the Body of a community. A body with a long past, a present of many voices, and a vision of the future. Reading the book and following its story, we enter this body, its bloodstream, its organs, its members. […]

Stories are being told like this all over the world. They are seldom printed and published. This book has now set an example.

Let us thank everyone who contributed to it for that example. – John Berger, 26 July 2010 (Taninges, France)

John Berger, in full John Peter Berger , in full John Peter Berger (born November 5, 1926, London, England), British essayist and cultural thinker as well as a prolific novelist, poet, translator, and screenwriter. He is best known for his novel G. and his book and BBC series Ways of Seeing. […]
Berger began exhibiting his own drawings and paintings in 1994 in galleries in New York City and England. […]
He is the recipient of the Golden PEN Award (2009), presented by English PEN to a writer whose “body of work has had a profound impact on readers.”

Source: John Berger | British essayist and cultural thinker | Britannica.com
Address: http://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Berger
Date Visited: Mon Apr 11 2016 13:47:20 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Representations of Birsa Munda: Leader of the 1890 Munda rebellion – Jharkhand

irish_anthrop_journal_indig_india_2016

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Visualizing memories

In his article, Daniel Rycroft addresses the problem of cultural heritage and its construction. Dealing with the cultural interface between Adivasis and post-colonial governance, he redefines heritage as ‘looking both ways’ – from the community outwards as well as the outsider’s gaze. His exploration of this interface between the archive and the portraiture, focuses on representations of Birsa Munda, the leader of the uligan [Ulgulaan] or Munda rebellion of the 1890s. Birsa is perceived both as a prophet by the Munda and as a ‘freedom-fighter’ in the larger society of Jharkhand. Exploring the visualisation of Birsa Munda, he defines the successive representations of Birsa as a chiasmic archive of different encounters and memories. He further shows that this archive, which engages with past rebellion, succeeds in re-invigorating the ethnographic present. This archive has an empowering effect by articulating lost memory to the ethnographic present.

Source: Irish Journal of Anthropology, Vol. 19(2) 2016 Autumn/Winter
EDITORIAL NOTE, LIDIA GUZY, MARINE CARRIN, HARALD TAMBS-LYCHE
https://www.anthropologyireland.org/images/2016_2/2016_2_1_Editorial%20Note.pdf
Accessed: 17-12-17

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 I believe that the Birsa Ulgulaan cannot be studied as a singular and isolated moment in the history of colonial India, but rather more powerfully as a metaphor and symbol of resistance that offers an alternative political vision. – Rahul Ranjan

Source: Asia Dialogue, Birsa Munda and his Ulgulaan (rebellion)
URL: https://theasiadialogue.com/2018/04/18/birsa-munda-and-his-ulgulaan-rebellion/
Date visited: 17 September 2019

 

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Posted in Adivasi, Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Colonial policies, Commentary, Eastern region, eBook download sites, ePub, History, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Names and communities, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Representations of Birsa Munda: Leader of the 1890 Munda rebellion – Jharkhand

Map | Provisions for particularly vulnerable tribal groups (PVTG): India’s Constitution guarantees justice “in tune with the customary law” of Scheduled Tribes

“Primitive, geographically isolated, shy and socially, educationally & economically backwardness these are the traits that distinguish Scheduled Tribes of our country from other communities. Tribal communities live in about 15% of the country’s areas in various ecological and geo-climatic conditions ranging from plains to forests, hills and inaccessible areas.” – National Commission for Scheduled Tribes, Government of India (Ministry of Tribal Affairs) http://www.ncst.nic.in  | To read more, click here >>

There are over 500 tribes (with many overlapping communities in more than one State) as notified under article 342 of the Constitution of India, spread over different States and Union Territories of the country, the largest number of tribal communities being in the State of Orissa. The main concentration of tribal population is in central India and in the North-eastern States. However, they have their presence in all States and Union Territories except Hayrana, Punjab, Delhi, Pondicherry and Chandigarh. The predominantly tribal populated States of the country (tribal population more than 50% of the total population) are:

Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Union Territories of Dadra & Nagar Haveli and Lakshadweep. States with sizeable tribal population and having areas of large tribal concentration are A.P. Assam, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa and Rajasthan.

Promotion of all round development of tribals inhabiting the length and breath of our country has received priority attention of the government. There are numerous government policies for ensuring the welfare and well being of tribals. The Govts. at State as well as Central levels have made sustained efforts to provide opportunity to these communities for their economic development by eradicating poverty and health problems and developing communication for removal of isolation of their habitats. The Constitution of India seeks to secure for all its citizens, among other things, social and economic justice, equality of status and opportunity and assures the dignity of the individual. The Constitution further provides social, economic and political guarantees to the disadvantaged sections of people. Some provisions are specific to both Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes and some are specific to only Scheduled Tribes. […]

Source: Central Government
Address: http://www.ncst.nic.in/sites/default/files/documents/central_government/File415.pdf
Date Visited: Thu Apr 06 2017 21:07:56 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Socio-economic Development Of Scheduled Tribes
For the Socio-economic and overall development of the Tribal people, special provisions and safeguards have been provided in the Constitution of India and some initiative have also been taken by the Government of India, including Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) strategy. The Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) strategy was aimed for the rapid socio-economic development of tribal people. The funds provided under the Tribal Sub Plan of the State have to be at least equal in proportion to the ST population of each State or UTs. Similarly Central Ministries/Departments are also required to earmark funds out of their budget for the Tribal Sub-Plan. As per guidelines issued by the Planning Commission, the Tribal Sub Plan funds are to be non-divertible and non-lapsable. The National Commission for Scheduled Tribes is vested with the duty to participate and advise in the planning process of socio-economic development of STs, and to evaluate the progress of their development under the Union and any State.

Source: Socio-economic Development Of Scheduled Tribes | National Commission for Scheduled Tribes
Address: http://www.ncst.nic.in/content/socio-economic-development
Date Visited: Thu Apr 06 2017 21:05:11 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Anthropology, Assimilation, Community facilities, Constitution and Supreme Court, Customs, Democracy, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Maps, Names and communities, Particularly vulnerable tribal group, PDF printfriendly, Quotes, Regions of India, Rights of Indigenous Peoples | Comments Off on Map | Provisions for particularly vulnerable tribal groups (PVTG): India’s Constitution guarantees justice “in tune with the customary law” of Scheduled Tribes