Celebrating the contribution by Asur, Birhor, Munda, Santal and other tribal communities: State Museum Ranchi – Jharkhand

The State Museum at present has several galleries which display different aspects of cultural heritage, especially those related to the state of Jharkhand. We have galleries separately classified in order to display the anthropological features, especially those related to the tribal way of life. The sculptural section has art objects representing different sculptural styles and iconographic manifestations. Potteries and other artifacts reteieved from archaeological excavation and so on.

Ethnological Gallery

In  this gallery the models representing the physical features, residential quarters, hunting and agricultural practices, consumes, musical instruments, weapons and several other objects and artifacts of day-to-day life of tribes of Jharkhand are displayed.

Asur :
The Asurs form a very important and ancient tribe of Jharkhand, Known as smelting and producing iron objects. They are found especially in such districts as Ranchi, Lohardaga, Latehar and Plaamu. They have their Panchyats at community level. Their main festival includes Sarhul, Phagua, Navakhans, Kachdel ect. They also engage themselves in agricultural practices for their livelihood.

Munda :
The Mundas form yet another important tribe of Jharkhand. They basically practice agriculture and occasionally involve in hunting for their livelihood. The Mundas speak well known Mundri dialet of the Astro Asiatic family.  They believe in God who is called Singbonga. The major festivals that they celebrate are Karma, Sarhul, Soharai, Moga, Phagua etc.

Birhor :
The Birhors are one of the most important tribal communities of the state, which unfortunately now is on the verge of extinvtion. This tribe is found confined to Hazaribagh, Chatra, Koderma, Ranchi, Singhbum, GIridih and Dhanbad districts. They are accomplished hunters. In order to support their subsistence, they also produce ropes.  Etymologically, it may be suggested that the Birhors is a very ancient tribe. ‘Bir’ meams forest and ‘hor’ means man. They are truly ‘men of jungles’. They speaks as Astro-Asiatic dialect and consider themselves as the decendents of sun on the earth, The major festivals that they are fond of celebrating include Karma, Sarhul, Diwali, Makarsandranti and Holi. […]

Source: http://www.statemuseumranchi.in/ehtnological.html
Date visited: 25 November 2017

Jharkhand Culture

The cultural mosaic of Jharkhand was dreamt about, shaped and polished by generations of communities, which have inhabited this land since time immemorial.

From the legendary Asurs and Santhals, to the Banjara, Bihor, Chero, Gond, Ho, Khond, Lohra, Mai Pahariya, Munda, Oraon, Kol or Kawar-over thirty-two tribal groups (28 % of the total population of the state), have left their impression on the culture of the region. And with them, were the cross-cultural influences of local non-tribal communities and successive waves of Buddhism and Jainism, Mughal rule and the reign of the Hindu emperors of Bengal.

Art historians ascribe the ‘oldest cave paintings’ in India, the “scroll paintings” to a Jharkhand tribe known as the Shabars, who today live on the edge of extinction. It is an established fact that Stone Age tools discovered in Hazaribagh district and axes and spearheads found in the Chaibasa area, are remnants of a civilization dating back a few thousand years. 10,000 to 30,000 years old rock paintings, paintings in huge caves in the Sati hills and other indicators of ancient, even pre-historic, human settlements are found in profusion.

The cultural mosaic of Jharkhand was dreamt about, shaped and polished by generations of communities, which have inhabited this land since time immemorial.

From the legendary Asurs and Santhals, to the Banjara, Bihor, Chero, Gond, Ho, Khond, Lohra, Mai Pahariya, Munda, Oraon, Kol or Kawar-over thirty-two tribal groups (28 % of the total population of the state), have left their impression on the culture of the region. And with them, were the cross-cultural influences of local non-tribal communities and successive waves of Buddhism and Jainism, Mughal rule and the reign of the Hindu emperors of Bengal.

Art historians ascribe the ‘oldest cave paintings’ in India, the “scroll paintings” to a Jharkhand tribe known as the Shabars, who today live on the edge of extinction. It is an established fact that Stone Age tools discovered in Hazaribagh district and axes and spearheads found in the Chaibasa area, are remnants of a civilization dating back a few thousand years. 10,000 to 30,000 years old rock paintings, paintings in huge caves in the Sati hills and other indicators of ancient, even pre-historic, human settlements are found in profusion.

Address: Khelgaon Mega Sports Complex, Hotwar, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
Tel. +91 (651) 2270011
Email : info@statemuseumranchi.in

Source: http://www.statemuseumranchi.in/artculture.html
Date visited: 3 December 2017

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