The Typecraft Initiative’s digital typeface based on Godna tattoos: Working with tribal women artists from Chhattisgarh

Rites of Passage | To view more photos and read the full text, click here >>

In general, women have a strong connection with the idea of a “vital cycle” not only as life givers, care-takers of children and the home; and their own monthly menstrual cycles. Some women, especially those from the tattoo community within the Gond tribe have a strong connection to the rites of passage — which are marked by the application of a certain godna tattoo motif on a specific part of the body — to mark the entrance into a new phase of life (such as puberty or pregnancy), for a woman. The motif and the placement varies according to the tribe they are inscribing the tattoo on. Baiga tribe motifs vary for instance, from Bhil tribes. That the tattoos are mainly done by women on women is another strong connection they have to the cycle of life.

Similarly, both Chittara and Mithila art was traditionally painted on the walls and floors outside the home — according to the season, festival or special occasion (for instance, marriage) by the lady of the house. The motifs (in the case of Chittara) and the subject matter (in the case of Mithila) reflect the changing of seasons and represent the different stages of life — from birth to death. […]

The over-arching idea for each new typecraft, is, to challenge both the craftsperson and ourselves as designers. The aim is to be able to engage and work with a number of forms of craft and tribal art from all parts of the country — that are made with varying materials for different purposes and a diverse set of meanings associated with the craft or tribal art.

Since I work a lot in the cultural sector, my goal is to include the completed typefaces from, The Typecraft Initiative, into these projects and also have more and more people and state governments use the these typefaces. It is only then that the project will be successful and can make a bigger impact.

Source: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Address: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 18:30:42 GMT+0100 (CET)

Godna typeface | To view more photos and read the full text, click here >>

Godna is a display typeface based on Gond tribal tattoo drawings.

For this edition of the project, we engaged with three tribal women artists — Ram Keli, Sumitra and Sunita — who belong to the Gond tribe of Chattisgarh in Central India. These and other women from this tribe etch tattoos onto the Baiga and other tribal women. […]

All the drawings and artworks are completely done by them and we never drew anything for the artists except as part of the instruction.

Source: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Address: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 18:51:25 GMT+0100 (CET)

Chittara | To view more photos and read the full text, click here >>

Chittara originated from ancient cave paintings and eventually found its way to the walls and floors of village homes. The Kannada word Chittara (which is related to chittra) means creating an image or drawing. Historically, the artform has been practiced by women of the Deevaru community in the Sagar district of Karnataka, where these images were painted on auspicious occasions on the interiors and exteriors of the home. These paintings are a part of the family and community rituals associated with daily life and festive seasons.

This form is only done by the woman of the house to make the entrance auspicious and to welcome the gods. In this project we had to explain the rules of type design as well as how this specific artwork can be transformed into type. We intentionally let the artist, Radha Sullur, draw and paint all the letters herself.  […]

Source: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Address: http://www.typecraftinitiative.org/
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 18:54:23 GMT+0100 (CET)

To read the full text, click here >>

Ishan Khosla is a designer, teacher and image-maker, currently living in New Delhi, India, where he has been heading Ishan Khosla Design (IKD) since 2008. Ishan is committed to building strong ties between the Netherlands and India. He was invited to the Netherlands in 2010 by the BNO, and, in 2011 by Dutch DFA to help create partnerships and links with Dutch designers, origanisations and educational institutions. He subsequently wrote, A Partnership of Contrasts for the Dutch DFA 2010 Annual Report. Since his invitation, Ishan has worked on several Dutch design initiatives such as Here, There, Everywhere by Droog Lab at Dharavi, Mumbai in 2011, and, Delhi 2050 by Anne Feenstra. In 2015, while working on the graphic design for the Bihar Museum, IKD invited Dutch design studio, Mijksenaar to work on the wayfinding aspects of the museum. IKD has also hosted public talks for Dutch designers — such as, Jurgen Bey , Roel Stavorinus as well as students from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Ishan continues to seek partnerships with Dutch designers, origanisations, educational institutions and the government.

IKD has developed the first tribal digital typeface. Based on godna (tattoo) art from Chattisgarh, and designed in collaboration with three tribal women (Ram Keli, Sunita and Sumitra) from the marginalised help create partnerships and links with Dutch designers, origanisations and educational institutions. He subsequently wrote, A Partnership of Contrasts for the Dutch DFA 2010 Annual Report. Since his invitation, Ishan has worked on several Dutch design initiatives such as Here, There, Everywhere by Droog Lab at Dharavi, Mumbai in 2011, and, Delhi 2050 by Anne Feenstra. In 2015, while working on the graphic design for the Bihar Museum, IKD invited Dutch design studio, Mijksenaar to work on the wayfinding aspects of the museum. IKD has also hosted public talks for Dutch designers — such as, Jurgen Bey , Roel Stavorinus as well as students from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Ishan continues to seek partnerships with Dutch designers, organisations, educational institutions and the government.

Published December 2016
©2016 Ishan Khosla Design, LLP

Research, Text and Design | Ishan Khosla
Ishan Khosla Design
Editor | Sheeba Bhatnagar

TYPEFACES USED IN THIS REPORT
This report uses both Dutch and Indian typefaces.
Avenir by Adrian Frutiger
Baloo by Ek Type
Fedra Sans by Typotheque
Godna by Ram Keli, Sunita and Sumitra (from the tattoo tribal art community in Chhattisgarh, India) | Ishan Khosla Design LLP (concept, co-ordination,

vectorisation) | Andreu Balius (type design)

The Typecraft Initiative

Source: 27_02_17_DesignPataka_ABSOLUTE_FINAL_V3.pdf
Address: http://dutchculture.nl/sites/default/files/27_02_17_DesignPataka_ABSOLUTE_FINAL_V3.pdf
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 18:15:10 GMT+0100 (CET)

New guide to India’s design sector for Dutch creatives who want to cooperate.

We are happy to present Design Pataka! The explosion of design in India: 2010 –2016. This long read will give culture professionals from the Netherlands insight into the Indian design sector. It is also a guide for creative Dutch  who want to reach out to their Indian counterparts for joint projects. We would like to express our gratitude to Delhi-based designer Ishan Khosla for researching, writing and compiling this comprehensive overview of Indian design.

For the passed 18 months we have worked hard to strengthen the cultural exchange between the Netherlands and India, specifically in the fields of design, games, photography and film. The goal was to build sustainable relationships between Indian and Dutch organizations and creatives and to boost opportunities for joint projects.  You will find more information about our activities in India here (Dutch).

Source: Road to Indian Design | Dutchculture | Centre for international cooperation
Address: http://dutchculture.nl/nl/news/road-indian-design
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 18:59:00 GMT+0100 (CET)

The Rabari women tattoo elaborate symbols onto their necks, breasts and arms, signifying their strong faith in magic.

Skin Deep: The Tale of India’s Tattoo Tradition

Sanchari Pal, The Better India, June 14, 2016 | To read the full article and view more photos, click here >>

Even among the tribes of western India, the craft of tattooing is revered, with tattoos having a close relation to secular and religious subjects of devotion. The Rabari women of Kutch have practised tattooing for decorative, religious, and therapeutic purposes for hundreds of years. A traditional Rabari tattoo kit is simple: a single needle and gourd bowl to hold the liquid pigment, which is made by mixing lamp soot with tannin from the bark of local trees. A small quantity of turmeric powder is also added to brighten the colour and to prevent swelling.

Source: The History Of India’s Tradition of Tattoos
Address: http://www.thebetterindia.com/58170/india-tattoo-tradition-history/
Date Visited: Tue Mar 21 2017 19:15:53 GMT+0100 (CET)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

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Tip | How to improve the living conditions for India’s tribal communities: World Water Day held annually on 22 March – United Nations

un-water-fresco-forum_2011

World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.

An international day to celebrate freshwater was recommended at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The United Nations General Assembly responded by designating 22 March 1993 as the first World Water Day.

Each year, World Water Day highlights a specific aspect of freshwater. In 2015, World Water Day has the theme “Water and Sustainable Development”.

In 2016, the theme is “Water and Jobs,” in 2017 “Wastewater” and in 2018 “Nature-based Solutions for Water”.

Source: UN-Water: World Water Day
Address: http://www.unwater.org/campaigns/world-water-day/en/
Declaration of the Youth participants of the launching of the 2013 International Year of Water Cooperation

7 Ways Indian Villages Adopted Water Management to Combat Drought

As most of India deals with the drastic consequences of drought, find out how these villages in India are reaping the benefits of efficient water management and revival systems.

It’s no secret that rainwater management and water harvesting can bring about a major socioeconomic turn around in villages and farmlands. […]

In the period between 1980 and 1990 in Gujarat, Sadguru Foundation, an NGO, worked hard to bring back water in five villages through watershed management and dams. For instance, in the Dahod district, Bhil tribals faced acute shortage of water for decades. It all changed when in 1994, check dams were built along the Machhan, and watershed management programs were undertaken. As the dams recharged the groundwater, water became available to the 153 households in that area. Similarly, the Raj-Samadhiyala village, near Rajkot, revived itself from an arid zone to a lush cultivated area. Gandhigram residents had no clean drinking water for decades. That changed in 1999, when the villagers took a loan to build a check dam. In Mandlikpur and Jhabua, the villagers initiated rainwater harvesting on the rooftops of their homes, besides undertaking watershed management to recharge their wells. These techniques got the villages through many spells of drought in the years to come. […]

“There are 230 households in the village and only those people who own shops would benefit directly from this project, that is, about 60 households. The rest of the families did not believe in the project at all,” he says. It took several meetings and presentations before all the villagers agreed. Ankush explained how the project would be beneficial for all of them, as eco-tourism could provide them with a good source of alternate income, based on their advantageous location.

Currently, seven months into the fellowship, Ankush is concentrating on two main projects. One of them is to set up a restaurant at the waterfall site that will serve local tribal cuisine. He wants the women in the village to be involved in this and is working with two self-help groups – training women on the workings of a restaurant, how to keep it up and running, how to speak with customers, etc.
The forest department has already agreed to sanction land for the construction of the restaurant and Ankush is trying to gather the required funds to take it forward next month. […]

After completing his Master’s in International Hospitality from the University of Perpignan in France, Ankush worked for eight years before quitting his Dubai-based job in 2014 in search of something new. An avid traveller at heart, he travelled for about a year before taking up this project in Gujarat. Here, he is working in collaboration with the non-profit organisation, Aga Khan Rural Support Programme, which helped him with the initial funding for the project.

According to him, the real impact of his fellowship has been in the change in perception towards eco-tourism that he has been able to create among the villagers and also for government officials. He is hopeful that with the newly gained knowledge the villagers will be able to take the project forward without his help.

“One of the reasons why I gave up on my old life was because I was tired of planning all the time. So I don’t have any plans at the moment, but I might come back to this region to take the project forward and develop facilities for rural homestays in the village,” concludes Ankush.

Source: 7 Ways Indian Villages Adopted Water Management to Combat Drought
Address: http://www.thebetterindia.com/53323/villages-fighting-drought-success-stories/
Date Visited: Wed Mar 22 2017 10:17:40 GMT+0100 (CET)

To view the Info-Graphic by unwater.org titled Water: Cooperation or Competition?, click here (PDF) >>

Pavillon de l’eau, Paris, France, 11 February 2013 

Preamble
1. We, the youth participating in the launching of the 2013 International Year of Water Cooperation, having met in Paris, France on 11 February 2013, are working together for the protection, restoration and better management of natural resources,
particularly fresh water, a vital resource which is becoming increasingly scarce and polluted every day.
2. We affirm our commitment to cooperate and to find solutions to the challenges that are threatening the
livelihoods of millions of people around the world, with emphasis on unequal access to water and sanitation, its linkages with climate change and a more equitable water governance, including aspects related to gender equality.
3. We affirm to work with honesty, transparency, with and for our communities, to join forces and share
capacities; to be fair between human needs and natural resources, and, to act in good faith.
4. We also affirm our commitment to cooperate and contribute to our governments’ efforts in achieving “The
Future We Want”, as well as in the implementation of other water-related international agreements, the 2013
International Year of Water Cooperation, the International Decade for Action: Water for Life”, the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, and the 2012 Declaration of the World Youth Parliament for Water.

[…] we acknowledge that enhanced cooperation, good governance and stakeholders’ participation at local, national, international and basin levels are essential for fair, and inclusive water distribution based on the local circumstances . We also highlight the role of parliaments in generating inclusive participation in cooperation with governments, civil society actors, water and sanitation experts, indigenous people, women, youth, and children, because we can altogether achieve great things with relatively small efforts.

Source: Youth_Declaration-International_Year_of_Water_Cooperation_2013.pdf
Address: http://www.unwater.org/fileadmin/user_upload/watercooperation2013/doc/Youth_Declaration-International_Year_of_Water_Cooperation_2013.pdf
Date Visited: Wed Mar 22 2017 09:50:50 GMT+0100 (CET)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

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Slideshow | Baha Parab, the Santal Flower Festival “celebrating Man’s Communion with Nature” – West Bengal

 
Baha Parab (Celebrating Man’s Communion with Nature)

by Dr. Boro Baski, Bishnubati

Baha Parab

28th Year of Adibasi Baha Parab (Santal Flower Festival), organized by Ghosaldanga Bishnubati Adibasi Trust, successfully celebrated with various eventful programmes on 9th March 2017.

BAHA means ‘flower’ in Santali . It is the second biggest festival of the Santals after SORHAI, the harvest festival. It is also considered the holiest festival of all and celebrated in the Bengali month of Falgun (Feb-March) every year. Falgun is the first month of Santal calendar. The festival celebrates man’s communion with nature. This is the time when most common trees, like Mohuwa, Peepal, Mango, Polash, Neem, Sal, Muringa bear new leaves, flowers or fruits. This is the time, Santals believe, when the trees become reproductive and one should not disturb their body and soul by plucking or cutting off their buds, flowers, leaves and branches. Therefore, Santals never pluck or eat the flowers or fruits of Mango trees, never tear off the leaves of Peepal and Neem trees before celebrating Baha. Women do not use Sal flowers in their hair for decoration and trees are not cut for firewood at this time. If it does happen, then the firewood is not brought to the village but is kept outside. Any family who breaks such rules will not be visited by the village priest who normally enters every family’s house during the Baha rituals.

In our Birbhum District (West-Bengal), the Baha festival is celebrated for two days. The ‘Naike’ or village priest who is the main celebrant of the festival, prepares himself physically and mentally on the first day by taking a bath, by wearing new clothes and by fasting. He also sleeps alone at home that night, away from his wife. The main puja of the Baha is held at the ‘Jaher Than’, the sacred grove outside the village. The Naike along with the village elders like the ‘Manjhi haram (headman), the Jog Manjhi (assistant headman), the Godet (convener), the Kudamnaike (assistant priest) and other villagers go to the ‘Jaher Than’, clean it and make a small symbolic hut with thatch for the offering on the next day. He constructs a number of ‘Pinds’ (altar) and rubs them with cow dung. In our village Bishnubati, sixteen altars have been made, but this number differs from village to village. Each ‘Pind’ is named after one of the benevolent ‘Bongas’ (spirits) who are located in different places of the village. The ‘Bongas’ were discovered by our ancestors who founded this village. When they chose the place to build a new village a boundary was identified. Within this boundary, different spirits bearing different names are being worshiped. These spots could be a bush, a forest, any water body, a roadside space or simply a barren land. We believe that these spirits are the original inhabitants of these places and are protecting them. Therefore our village people can be happy and prosperous only if we live with them harmoniously.

In the morning of the second day, the headman sends the young men of the village to the forest to collect Sal flowers. After that the Naike, along with the villagers, goes to the ‘Jaher Than’ with sixteen chicks, collected from the village, and offers then to the spirits of the village and of the surroundings. During the offering, water instead of rice beer is being used.. The Naike prays to the spirits and to the ancestors who after death have joined our benevolent spirits. The Naike prays for all the villagers, for the children, the youth, the animals who go out to the fields, forests and rivers every day so that life may remain safe, and that the benevolent spirits may protect them from all evils spirits.

Later the Naike and the villagers prepare khichuri and eat it outside the village. In the afternoon, the Naike, along with his companions, visits all the families and distributes Sal flowers. The woman of the house receives the flower from the priest in the folds of her sari after she has ceremonially applied oil on his feet and washed them. An unmarried man carries the water on his shoulder and after exchanging greetings with her, sprinkles it on the shoulder of the woman. After receiving the flower the women put it in their hair and the men behind their ears. The rest of the flowers are kept in the ceiling of their thatched or tiled roof. This is the sign that the village has celebrated Baha and men and women can now sing, dance, drink rice beer and enjoy themselves.

Santal festivals have always been closed community festivals. There is little scope for non-Santals to join and integrate with them. Considering this limitation, 28 years ago then registered societies of Ghosaldanga and Bishnubati started to organize the Adibasi Baha Parab which is an extension of the traditional Baha festival. The main objective was to open this festival to Santals of other villages and to non-Santals and thus make it inclusive. We wanted to disseminate the ideas of Baha among the people at large. We celebrated for one day after the traditional Baha of the village is over. We hold it on the large playground of Ghosaldanga. After the procession in the village, a symbolic Baha ritual is performed on the playground. Later various tribal sports, folk dances are organized — everybody can take part. In the evening the prize distribution, felicitations, Santali dramas and a whole night musical programme take place. This year, forty folk dance teams from various villages of Birbhum District and Jharkand took part.

The recipient of this year’s Baha Award was a well-known Santal traditional medicine man, Mr. Ram Hembrom of Ramnagar village, Birbhum District. Mr. Hembrom has grown 475 different varieties of herbal plants in his courtyard and is treating the villagers with these medicinal plants since the last thirty years. Santali dramas ‘Kriya’ and ‘Monetabon bodolabon’ were also staged by Sidu Kanu Smriti Sangha of Nildanga and Kalitola Sporting Club. Another special event of this year was the felicitation of the ‘Manjhi baba (Santal traditional leaders) of ten different villages by the local police administration who later talked about the positive impression this inclusive programme has created.

Source: courtesy Dr. Boro Baski by email (16 March 2017)

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Santali and related tribal languages of the Chotanagpur region: Mundari, Ho and Birjiya – Jharkhand

Birjiya [Birjia] is the language spoken by Asur tribe/ethnic group, just as Kurukh is spoken by Oraon group, Santali by Santal group, Mundari by Munda group, Ho by Ho group and Kharia by Kharia group.  These are broadly identified by sociolinguists and anthropologists as belonging to two distinct linguistic and ethnic families:

a. Mundari (Santal, Munda, Ho and Birjiya)
b. Adi-Dravidian (Oraon, Kharia).

Santali is very similar to Mundari, Ho and Birjiya (i.e. mutually comprehensible) but different from Kurukh and Kharia.

The Chotanagpur region of Jharkhand has many tribal groups living close to each other. A unique phenomenon of this region is the emergence of a hybrid language called “Nagpuri” or “Sadri”, which is used as lingua franca. It is a mix of many tribal languages and Hindi. It’s a bit like the Creole used among migrants in some areas of the world. Purists dislike the Nagpuri/ Sadri language and are trying to revive their mother-tongue.

In Santal Parganas (Dumka) region, there are two main tribal groups – the Santal and the Paharia. Paharias are considered backward and live on hills while Santals are considered more advanced and live on the plains. The Santals see themselves as dominant and do not intermarry with Paharias, though they do intermarry with Oraon and Munda groups (which are the most advanced among Chotanagpur tribes).

There are other small groups also in Chotanagpur like the Birhor of Netarhat and the Chik Baraik. The Birhor and Paharia communities are among the “Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups” (PVTGs) identified by the government, entitiling them to special welfare schemes.

Even among different tribal groups, there is some friction and some sense of animosity. The Santals and Mundas are supposed to be most “martial” because the two great tribal rebellions occurred among them – the Santal Hul of 1855-56 (led by two brothers named Sido and Kanu Murmu) and the Munda Ulgulan of 1872-1901 (led by Birsa Bhagwan).

Courtesy: Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 17 March 2017)

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Santal village development and social work inspired by Rabindranath Tagore: Visva-Bharati’s Sriniketan – West Bengal

Rabindranath Tagore: adventure of ideas and innovative practices in education by Prof. Kumkum Bhattacharya (Springer, 2014) | Publication details and libraries on Worldcat.org >>

Authors: Bhattacharya, Kumkum

  • Describes the evolution of Tagore’s ideas stemming from his personal experience of schooling
  • Elucidates the emergence of a university that would offer the best of the east and the west as well as Visva-Bharati in contemporary times
  • Explains Tagore’s aim to extend education for social rejuvenation, uplift and reconstruction of rural societies and rural life

About this book

This new addition to Springer’s series on Key Thinkers in World Education tracks the intellectual and philosophical journey of a trail-blazing innovator whose ideas have fired the imaginations of progressive educationalists for almost a century. The volume’s in-depth analysis of the educational philosophy of Bengali polymath Rabindranath Tagore offers an unrivalled focus on his highly influential views.

Tagore—poet, internationalist, humanist, and the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for literature—lived on the cusp of change between two momentous centuries in world civilization and foresaw the dissolution of colonialism and the globalization of culture. His ideas on education placed the creative individual at the centre of the quest for knowledge. Eschewing the artificial distinctions between elementary and higher learning, he advocated the importance of sowing the seed of humanism as early as possible, and fostering the individual’s enjoyment of education as well as their courage to challenge conventions. In doing so, he anticipated the modern concern with critical thinking at the same time as he was encouraging independence of thought and action as a counter to colonial oppression and condescension. Concise yet thorough, this volume on one of the most original thinkers of the last century covers every aspect of Tagore’s highly original educational philosophy.

Source: Rabindranath Tagore – Adventure of Ideas and Innovative | Kumkum Bhattacharya | Springer
Address: http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319008363
Date Visited: Fri Mar 17 2017 10:02:58 GMT+0100 (CET)

SRINIKETAN

The Institute of Rural Reconstruction was founded in 1922 at Surul at a distance of about three kilometres from Santiniketan. It was formally inaugurated on February 6, 1922 with Leonard Elmhirst as its first Director. Thus the second but contiguous campus of Visva-Bharati came to be located in 1923 at a site which assumed the name of Sriniketan. The chief object was to help villagers and people to solve their own problems instead of a solution being imposed on them from outside.

In consonance with the ideas about reconstruction of village life, a new type of school meant mainly for the children of neighbouring villages who would eventually bring the offering of their acquired knowledge for the welfare of the village community was also conceived. This school, Siksha-Satra, was started in Santiniketan in 1924 but was shifted to Sriniketan in 1927. The Lok-Siksha Samsad, an organization for the propagation of non-formal education amongst those who had no access to usual educational opportunities, was started in 1936. Siksha-Charcha for training village school teachers followed next year.

Source: Sriniketan
Address: http://www.visvabharati.ac.in/Sriniketan.html
Date Visited: Sun Mar 12 2017 12:33:23 GMT+0100 (CET)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

More publications by Prof. Kumkum Bhattacharya

JOURNALS:
• “Relevance of Village Studies: History and Reality” published in The Visva-Bharati Quarterly, Nov. 1998.
• “Growing up in a Santal Village” published in the Journal of Comparative Cultures, No. 4, 1999 University of Sapporo, Japan.
• “Experience of marginality: the Santals” (joint) published in the Journal of the Anthropological Survey of India, Vol. 51, No., 1 March 2003.
• “Leisure among the tribes” published in Journal of Tribal Studies, New Delhi, Vol.1, 2003.
• “Tribes – State of Mind?” (joint) published in the Journal of Indian Anthropological Society, Vol 38, 2003.
• 2004 “Dr. Surajit Chandra Sinha: A Tribute” (joint) in Indian Social Science Review, Vol. 6 No. 1 (January-June) 135-149.
• 2010 “Sustainable Development and Spirituality” in Sustainability Tomorrow, Vol 5, Issue 1; January-March 2010, CII-ITC Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Development, New Delhi.
• 2010; “Sustainable Development and Spirituality” in Journal of Social Work & Social Development, Vol.1 No.1; June 2010, Department of Social Work, Visva-Bharati.
• 2010 Invited to write the entry on Rabindranath Tagore for the ACPI Encyclopedia of Philosophy in two volumes edited by Johnson J. Puthenpurackal, Bangalore, Asian Trading Corporation.
• 2011 “Jivan Devata: Quest for Interpretations” in Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research, Special Issue on Rabindranath Tagore, Volume XXVIII, Number 1, 155-164, January-March 2011.
BOOKs:
• Santals: entering the free stream (vernacular) with Sona Murmu, Boro Baski and Gokul Hansda, 2001, Eastern Zonal Cultural Centre, Kolkata, India.
• Conditioning and empowerment of women: a multidimensional approach edited with Asha Mukherjee, 2003, Gyan Publishing House, New Delhi.
• Celebrating Freedom: the Santal way of life, edited by Boro Baski and Kumkum Bhattacharya, Ghosaldanga Adibasi Seva Sangha.

Source: Kumkum Bhattacharya
Address: http://www.visva-bharati.ac.in/Faculty/faculties/sriniketan/siksha_vibhaga/social%20work/kumkum_bhattacharya.htm
Date Visited: Sun Mar 12 2017 11:54:20 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Video | Santali dances performed at the Sahitya Akademi’s Festival of Letters (February 2017) – New Delhi

YouTube post by Sunder Manoj Hembrom
Sahitya Akademi reak̕ Meghdoot akhṛare John Soren ar unire̠n do̠l Bado̠li.

This was the first song in the programme at Meghdoot Open Air Theatre, performed by Badoli Cultural Troupe on 25 February 2017.

Among the main types of Santali folksongs are the Sohrae, Don, Lagre, Durumjak’, etc. All four were performed by the Badoli group at the Festival of Letters 2017. A notable exception was the Dasae dance which is performed only by men.

Information courtesy: Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 20 March 2017)

Performed by Badoli Cultural Group, Dumka (SP) at Meghdoot Open Air Theatre, Lalit Kala Akademi, N. Delhi. Video courtesy: Dr. Ivy Hansdak

Santali Dance performence by Badoli Cultural Group
Dumka (Santal Parganas) on the occasion of SAHITYOTSAVA 2017 at Meghdoot Open Air Theatre, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi 25 February 2017

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International Women’s Day 2017: Tribal artiste Sukri Bommagowda honoured – Karnataka

tribal-artiste-sukri-bommagowda_ie_9-3-17

KSRTC honours tribal artiste Sukri Bommagowda

By Express News Service | Published: 09th March 2017

BENGALURU: On the occasion of International Women’s Day, KSRTC honoured Padma Shri awardee and tribal leader Sukri Bommagowda (Sukrajji) here on Wednesday. It handed over D25,000 and issued a free bus pass to her. A press release stated that KSRTC also honoured 34 women employees in 17 divisions for their service. The release stated:
“KSRTC is the first government organisation in the state which has implemented 33 per cent reservation for the women in jobs. Around 10,000 women are working under KSRTC… Of the 37,569 officers/officials, 6.65 per cent are women.” […]

Source: KSRTC honours tribal artiste Sukri Bommagowda- The New Indian Express
Address: http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/bengaluru/2017/mar/09/ksrtc-honours-tribal-artiste-sukri-bommagowda-1579384.html
Date Visited: Thu Mar 09 2017 10:29:38 GMT+0100 (CET)

UN Secretary-General’s message for the International Women’s Day

Women’s rights are human rights. But in these troubled times, as our world becomes more unpredictable and chaotic, the rights of women and girls are being reduced, restricted and reversed. Empowering women and girls is the only way to protect their rights and make sure they can realize their full potential. Read more>

Source: International Women’s Day 2017 | UN Women – Headquarters
Address: http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/in-focus/international-womens-day
Date Visited: Thu Mar 09 2017 11:09:31 GMT+0100 (CET)

International Women’s Day is a global celebration of all women, everywhere. It is a rallying call; both for reflection on lessons learned and for accelerating momentum towards gender equality and the empowerment of every girl and woman.

It is a day to rejoice in the extraordinary acts of women and to stand together, as a united force to advance gender equality around the world.

A bit of history: International Women’s Day, back to 1975

Since its inception, International Women’s Day has grown into a global celebration of past and present accomplishments of women, and as an opportunity to look ahead to the untapped potential and opportunities for future generations of women.

In 1945, the Charter of the United Nations became the first international agreement to affirm the principal of equality between women and men. With that belief in mind, the UN celebrated its first official International Women’s Day in 1975, 42 years ago.

This year, the UN theme for International Women’s Day is “Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality”. Despite the enormous progress since 1975, women are still underrepresented in too many  sectors of society, undermining progress and sustainable development. It  constrains creativity and talent and suffocates inclusion and pluralism. This does not just harm women – it weakens the very fabric of societies.

For the celebration of International Women’s Day 2017, UNESCO will focus on Women and Art, showcasing the work of young women artists and discussing the way forward.

Source: International Women’s Day 2017 | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
Address: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/womens-day
Date Visited: Thu Mar 09 2017 11:04:10 GMT+0100 (CET)


Women’s collectives foster access to justice in India

jharkhand-women-unesco-screenshot2013Through special women’s courts and justice committees, women’s collectives in eastern India have forged an increasingly respected system to access justice, which also addresses cases of violence against women. They resolve disputes through both formal and informal channels, while providing emotional support and counselling. More >>

Source: Search Results | UN Women – Headquarters
Address: http://www.unwomen.org/en/search-results?keywords=tribe%20india
Date Visited: Thu Mar 09 2017 11:12:19 GMT+0100 (CET)

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  • Learn more about Government institutions and NGOs: Govt. of India, NGOs and international
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Video | Creation Myths of six tribal groups: Sahitya Akademi’s Annual Festival of Letters (February 2017) – New Delhi

The Sahitya Akademi (India’s National Academy of Letters) had its Annual Festival of Letters in February 2017, during which the Creation Myth of six tribal groups were narrated and presented in the original languages (Kurukh/ Oraon, Munda, Santali, Kharia, Ho and Biryia/ Asur).

Here are two videos that were shown with live-streaming and are available on Youtube.

The session is in two parts:

Part I has narrators from Munda, Kurukh/ Oraon, Ho and Birjiya/ Asur;
Part II has narrators from Kharia and Santali.

Source: courtesy Dr. Ivy Imogene Hansdak (Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi)

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Published with the aim of enabling members of tribal communities to “face the modern world as sturdy, self- reliant citizens”: Tribal Hyderabad – Telangana & Andhra Pradesh

“We have no time to lose in putting our aboriginals on their feet and enabling them to face the modern world as sturdy, self- reliant citizens.” – Foreword by W.V. Grigson

Published 1945/00/00

Topics NATURAL SCIENCES, Biological sciences in general, General and theoretical biology

Publisher The Revenue Department.
Pages 247
Language English
Call number 33440
Book contributor Osmania University
Collection universallibrary

Source: Tribal Hyderabad : Furer Hamendorf Charistoph Von. : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
Address: https://archive.org/details/tribalhyderabad033440mbp
Date Visited: Sat Nov 26 2016 13:08:29 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Tagore’s Santiniketan, “an Abode of Learning Unlike Any in the World” – West Bengal

santiniketan-tagore-the-better-india-31-8-16web

Sanchari Pal, The Better India, August 31, 2016 | To read the full story and view more photos in high resolution, click here >>

Located about 158 km northwest of Kolkata in Bengal’s rural hinterland, Santiniketan embodies Rabindranath Tagore’s vision of a place of learning that is unfettered by religious and regional barriers. Established in 1863 with the aim of helping education go beyond the confines of the classroom, Santiniketan grew into the Visva Bharati University in 1921, attracting some of the most creative minds in the country. […]

As one of the earliest educators to think in terms of the global village, he envisioned an education that was deeply rooted in one’s immediate surroundings but connected to the cultures of the wider world.

With this in mind, on December 22, 1901, Rabindranath Tagore established an experimental school at Santiniketan with five students (including his eldest son) and an equal number of teachers. He originally named it Brahmacharya Ashram, in the tradition of ancient forest hermitages called tapoban.
Rabindranath Tagore and Students, Santiniketan, 1929.

The guiding principle of this little school is best described in Tagore’s own words, “The highest education is that which does not merely give us information but makes our life in harmony with all existence.” […]

Tagore wanted his students to feel free despite being in the formal learning environment of a school, because he himself had dropped out of school when he found himself unable to think and felt claustrophobic within the four walls of a classroom. […]

Flexible class schedules allowed for shifts in the weather and the seasonal festivals Tagore created for the children.

In an attempt to help with rural reconstruction, Tagore also sought to expand the school’s relationship with the neighbouring villages of the Santhal tribal community. Thanks to his efforts, Santiniketan has today become the largest centre for educated Santhals in West-Bengal. Many of them have become teachers, several serving in Visva Bharati itself, while others have become social workers.

Santiniketan can be credited with taking the first path breaking steps in the field of education at a time when the country was slowly getting hitched to the European mode of education (textual and exam oriented knowledge imparted in closed classrooms).

Other than a humane and environment friendly educational system that aimed at overall development of the personality, Santiniketan also offered one of the earliest co-educational programmes in South Asia. […]

Tagore was one of the first to support and bring together different forms of arts at Santiniketan. He invited artists and scholars from other parts of India and all over the world to live together at Santiniketan on a daily basis and share their cultures with the students of Visva Bharati. He once wrote:
“Without music and the fine arts, a nation lacks its highest means of national self-expression and the people remain inarticulate.” […]

The grand Poush Utsav is celebrated on the Foundation Day of the University, while the colourful Basant Utsav is celebrated on the occasion of Holi. The Nandan Mela, which was originally started to raise money for a poor student who needed money for treatment, is today an event where university students display and sell their art. Other events like the Sarodotsav (Autumn Festival), Maghotsav (Founding Day of the Sriniketan campus) and Brikhsharopan Utsav (Tree Planting Festival) are also celebrated with great pomp and fervour.
On all these occasions, the entire campus has a festive atmosphere, with baul (traditional wandering minstrels of Bengal) songs, tribal dances, and other cultural performances being organised throughout the township. […]

Thanks to Tagore’s legacy, Santiniketan has managed to preserve Bengal’s fast-disappearing rural crafts culture through folk markets, like the weekly Bondangaar Haat, and rural co-operatives, like Amar Kutir. […]

santiniketan-taladhwaj-thatched-hut-the-better-india-31-8-16web

This ground-breaking outlook is also the reason why Santiniketan has given India many luminaries like pioneering painter Nandalal Bose, famous sculptor Ramkinkar Baij, Nobel-winning economist Amartya Sen, globally renowned filmmaker Satyajit Ray, and the country’s leading art historian R. Siva Kumar. The University also has several eminent international alumni that include Indonesian painter Affandi, Italian Asianist Giuseppe Tucci, Chinese historian Tan Chung, eminent Indologist Moriz Winternitz, and Sri Lankan artist Harold Peiris, among many others. Pouring his creative genius into his work, Tagore himself produced some of his best literary works, paintings and sketches at Santiniketan. Over the years, Santiniketan has adapted to the changing times. But the essence of the place is still what Tagore wanted it to be.

The Nobel Laureate’s life, philosophy and literary works find their greatest reflection in Santiniketan, where classes are still taught in the open, where nature and its seasons are still celebrated instead of religious festivals, where the graduation ceremony is marked by the gifting of a chhatim leaf, and where education is rooted in Tagore’s philosophy that “the whole world can find a nest.” […]

How to reach Santiniketan
The distance from Kolkata to Santiniketan is about 182 km. Santiniketan is well connected to Kolkata via road and rail.
By Rail: The nearest station is Bolpur. Take the Visva-Bharati Fast Passenger or Rampurhat Express from Howrah to reach Bolpur within 2.5 hours.
By Road: If you follow the Durgapur Expressway, it takes approximately 4 hours to reach Santiniketan. Buses to Bolpur are available from Esplanade bus terminal in Kolkata […]

Source: Exploring Tagore’s Santiniketan, a Unique Abode of Learning
Address: http://www.thebetterindia.com/66627/santiniketan-rabindranath-tagore-bengal/
Date Visited: Wed Dec 14 2016 13:28:16 GMT+0100 (CET)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

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India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Tamil Nadu, Telangana & Tripura

There are 29 states and 7 Union territories in the country. Union Territories are administered by the President through an Administrator appointed by him/her. | Learn more >>

States and Capitals

  1. Tamil Nadu (Chennai)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  2. Telangana (Hyderabad)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  3. Tripura (Agartala)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>

Note

States and Union Territories do not generally account for persons with “tribal roots”, unless they are home to people recognized as members of a  Scheduled Tribe (ST) under the constitution of India. Yet countless people with “tribal roots” live in metropolitan and touristic areas such as Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Goa, Kolkata, Mumbai. Their ranks include students, professionals, scientists and employees working for government agencies, educational institutions, banks and businesses.

While an educated person with tribal roots may be lauded for being assimilated as “main stream”, many others remain unnoticed even by their neighbours and local authorities. Their ranks include vulnerable boys and girls – many among them working as live-in maids – who “simply disappear” from their villages without a trace. They are being lured in growing numbers, often with false promises of a “good job” in the city. | Rescue and rehabilitation measures for victims of human trafficking and child abuse >>

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Nehru Centenary Tribal Museum Hyderabad: “Celebrating the aboriginals who lived on this very hill” – Andhra Pradesh

October 22, 2012 | To read the full description with pictures, click here >>

Located right in the heart of city near Banjara hills, celebrating the aboriginals who lived on this very hill is the Nehru Centenary Tribal Museum Hyderabad.

Nehru Centenary Tribal Museum Hyderabad

On the ground floor of Tribal Museum Hyderabad, through Chenchu tribes dioramas. They try to showcase their conical huts, their honey collection technique, their hunting equipment. And techniques as they continue to be hunter-gatherers. […]

In terms of activities of women and cultivation method called Podu where they keep clearing the jungle in small patches for agriculture. The other half of the hall focuses on the developmental activities being done by the government for the tribal communities. […]

Source: On The Tribal Land – Tribal Museum Hyderabad | Inditales
Address: http://www.inditales.com/tribal-museum-hyderabad/
Date Visited: Mon Oct 24 2016 14:46:32 GMT+0200 (CEST)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

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International seminar on indigenous health care systems: The Asiatic Society, Kolkata – West Bengal

TWO DAY INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON
“TRIBAL/ INDIGENOUS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM: TRIBUTE TO P.O. BODDING”
23rd & 24th February, 2017
Venue: VIDYASAGAR HALL OF THE ASIATIC SOCIETY

A two day international seminar on “Tribal/ Indigenous Health care system: Tribute to P.O. Bodding”
Proposer: Ranjana Ray, Anthropological Secretary, The Asiatic Society

Concept note

Paul Olaf Bodding (1865 – 1938) was a Norwegian Missionary, linguist and folklorist. He was in India for 44 years (1889–1933). His head quarter was in Dumka town in the Santhal Parganas-district. Bodding is still remembered for his work among the Santal people. He created the first alphabet and wrote the first grammar for the Santali-speaking people in eastern India.

Asiatic Society published his famous work Studies in Santal Medicine and Connected Folklore in 1925 – 40, Memoirs of The Asiatic Society, Vol. X. Subsequently it was reprinted in 1986. The book is divided into three parts: part I – The Santals and Disease, part II- Santal Medicine and part III – How the Santals live. Rev. Bodding treated the concept of medicine of the tribe in view of the general attitude of the tribe in respect to life and death, God and spirit. Bodding had taken a holistic view in understanding disease.

The seminar aims at looking into the works on indigenous health care system by inviting scholars who have taken up the cudgel left by Bodding. However, the seminar will not restrict in Santal or other tribes only but in to concept of health, care, disease, cure and remedies both at the tangible and intangible levels with a wider span.

Source: Courtesy Boro Baski (M.S.W., Ph.D.) co-founder and principal of Rolf Schoembs Vidyashram,  personal message 23 Febrary 2017

PROGRAMME

23rd February, 2017

Inaugural Session: 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

10:30: a.m.: Welcome address : Dr. Satyabrata Chakrabarti, General Secretary, The Asiatic Society

10: 40 a.m.: Introducing the seminar: Professor Ranjana Ray, Anthropological Secretary, The Asiatic Society and coordinator of the Seminar.

10:45 a.m.: Presidential Address : Professor Isha Mahammad, President, The Asiatic Society

10:50 a.m. Key-Note address: Professor Arabinda N Chowdhury, Consultant Psychiatrist,          Forward Thinking, Birmingham, U.K.

11:30 a.m.   Vote of thanks: Dr. Sujit Kumar Das, Treasurer of the Asiatic Society                                               

Academic Session – I

12:00 to 1:30p.m.

Chairperson: Professor Swapan K. Pramanik, former Vice Chancellor, Vidyasagar University

Speakers: Professor P. C. Joshi,  Dr. Pinak Tarafdar, Dr. Suhrid Kumar Bhowmik

Academic Session – II

2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Chair person: Dr. Ranjit K. Bhattachary

Speakers: Professor Subhadra Mitra Channa, Professor Amrita Bagga, Ms. Rita Kumari, Dr. Suman Chakrabarti & Dr. Pratibha Mondal

24th February, 2017

Academic Session-III

10:30 a.m. – 12 noon

Chairperson: Professor A. N. Chowdhuri

Speakers: Professor Paolo Cianconi, Professor Buddhadeb Choudhuri, Professor B. V. Sharma

Academic Session – IV

12 noon to 1:30 p.m.

Chairperson: Professor Falguni Chakrabarty

Speakers: Dr. Sohini Banerjee, Dr. Amit Kisku & Shri Subhamay Kisku

Academic Session – V

2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Chairperson: Professor Buddhadev Choudhuri

Speakers: Dr. A. K. Chattopadhyay, Sm. Nutan Jha, Dr. Rajanikant Pandey & Dr. Diptendu Chatterjee

Valedictory session

4:00 p. m. to 5p. m.

Chairperson : Professor Ranjana Ray

Speakers: Dr. Promodini Hansdak & Dr. Boro Baski                           

Vote of thanks: Professor Ranjana Ray, Co-ordinator of the Seminar

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Bibliographic information on books illustrated by tribal artists: Books for the reading pleasure of children in different languages

  • worldcat-illustrated-tribal-india-screenshotFor bibliographic information on illustrated books, check the Illustrated Tribal India list on worldcat.org >>
  • For up-to-date information on titles in print, visit the websites of adivaani.org, bhashaebooks.orgprathambooks.orgtarabooks.com & tulikabooks.com (India’s leading publishers on indigenous issues, Adivasi women as artists and illustrators, multilingual text- and children’s books, linguistics and other research works)

First words: Pratham Books launches a publishing project to promote Indian tribal languages

Saurabh Kumar, Livemint, Jul 05 2014 | To read the full story, click here >>

This 10-book series has been published in Odia and the languages used by four tribal communities in Odisha (Kui, Saura, Munda and Juanga), in the Odia script. “They are the first-ever books for the reading pleasure of children in these languages,” says Manisha Chaudhry, editor, Pratham Books.

tribal_book_series_pratham_screenshot

Pratham has used the bilingual format to bring out English and Hindi versions of all the books. Urdu and English, and Marathi and English, formats are in the works.

Since the books are being published under an open licence, anyone can translate them into another language. In fact, two books have already been published in the Tamil and English format. […]

Source: First words – Livemint
Address: http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/HYJRU9oOiUxzN9Yh96sHJP/First-words.html
Date Visited: Mon Feb 27 2017 20:24:25 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Information Relating to Tribals: The National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (NCST) – Government of India

The National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (NCST) was established by amending Article 338 and inserting a new Article 338A in the Constitution through the Constitution (89th Amendment) Act, 2003. | Learn more >>

Source: Introduction | National Commission for Scheduled Tribes
Address: http://www.ncst.gov.in/content/introduction
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:11:37 GMT+0100 (CET)

The framers of the Constitution took note of the fact that certain communities in the country were suffering from extreme social, educational and economic backwardness arising out of age-old practice of untouchability and certain others on account of this primitive agricultural practices, lack of infrastructure facilities and geographical isolation, and who need special consideration for safeguarding their interests and for their accelerated socio-economic development. These communities were notified as Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes as per provisions contained in Clause 1 of Articles 341 and 342 of the Constitution respectively.

Socio-economic Development Of Scheduled Tribes

Socio Economic Development

For the Socio-economic and overall development of the Tribal people, special provisions and safeguards have been provided in the Constitution of India and some initiative have also been taken by the Government of India, including Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) strategy. The Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) strategy was aimed for the rapid socio-economic development of tribal people. The funds provided under the Tribal Sub Plan of the State have to be at least equal in proportion to the ST population of each State or UTs. Similarly Central Ministries/Departments are also required to earmark funds out of their budget for the Tribal Sub-Plan. As per guidelines issued by the Planning Commission, the Tribal Sub Plan funds are to be non-divertible and non-lapsable. The National Commission for Scheduled Tribes is vested with the duty to participate and advise in the planning process of socio-economic development of STs, and to evaluate the progress of their development under the Union and any State.

Source: National Commission for Scheduled Tribes | Government of India
Address: http://www.ncst.gov.in/
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:10:02 GMT+0100 (CET)

Other Information Relating to Tribals

Source: Other Information Relating to Tribals | National Commission for Scheduled Tribes
Address: http://www.ncst.gov.in/content/other-information-relating-tribals
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:06:53 GMT+0100 (CET)

National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (Regional Offices)

6th Floor, B-Wing, Loknayak Bhavan, Khan Market New Delhi-110003 PBAX No. 011-24646954, FAX No. 011-24624628, 24657474, 24624191 Toll Free No. 1800-11-7777 As on 25/01/2016

S.No Location & Address of Office Name & Designation of the Officer incharge Jurisdiction
1. Room No.309, Nirman Sadan, CGO Complex, 52-A, Arera Hills, Bhopal-462011 Shri Virender, Director Ph: 0755 2576530 0755 2578272(F), Email: ro-bhopal@ncst.nic.in M.P., Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala, Goa, and Union Territories of Dadra& Nagar Haveli and Lakshadweep.
2. N-1/297, IRC Village, Bhubaneshwar-751015 Shri N. C. Dalai, Director Ph:0674 2551616, 0674 2551818 (F), Email: ro-bbsr@ncst.nic.in Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal and Union Territories of Andaman & Nicobar Islands, and Pondicherry
3. Room No. 101 & 102, first floor, KendriyaSadan, Sector-10, Vidhyadhar Nagar, Jaipur-302023 Shri S. K. Misra, Director Ph:0141 2236462, 0141 2235488(F) Email: ro-jaipur@ncst.nic.in Gujarat, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir, Punjab, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, NCT of Delhi and Union Territories of Chandigarh and Daman & Diu.
4. R-26, Sector-2, Avanti Vihar, Post Office Ravigram, Raipur-492006 Shri M. K. Pandiya, Assistant Director, Ph:0771 2443334 0771 2443335 (F), Email:ro-raipur@ncst.nic.in Chhattisgarh
5. 14, New A.G. Co-operative Colony, Kadru, Ranchi-834002 Shri S. R. Triya, Research Officer Ph:0651 2341677, 0651 2340368(F), Email:ro-ranchi@ncst.nic.in Bihar, Jharkhand, and Uttar Pradesh
6. Rabekka Villa, Temple Road, Lower Lachumiere, Shillong-793001 Shri P. S. Chakraborty, Assistant Director, Ph:0364 2504202 0364 2221362(F) Email: ro-shilong@ncst.nic.in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur,Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura,

Source: Regional Offices | National Commission for Scheduled Tribes
Address: http://www.ncst.gov.in/content/regional-offices
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:14:34 GMT+0100 (CET)

Jaideep Deogharia, Times of India,  Sep 11, 2016

RANCHI: National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (NCST) visited villagers displaced by one of the flagship projects of Independent India – Heavy Engineering Corporation – after a gap of 55 years. | To read the full article, click here >>

Source: Tribal panel visits HEC oustees after 50 years – Times of India
Address: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ranchi/Tribal-panel-visits-HEC-oustees-after-50-years/articleshow/54276597.cms
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:21:25 GMT+0100 (CET)

S. Prasad, The Hindu, PUDUCHERRY: September 02, 2014 | To read the full article, click here >>

The Union government is in favour of including the Irulas of Union Territory of Puducherry in the list of Scheduled Tribes.

The Centre has sent the proposal in this regard to the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (ST) for final approval, said Rameshwar Oraon, Chairperson, National Commission for Scheduled Tribes.

A three-member team led by Dr. Oraon is on a three-day visit to Puducherry and Karaikal to study the proposal of the Puducherry government for identification of five communities including Irular, Kattunayakan, Malaikuruvan, Yerukkula and Kuruman as Scheduled Tribes.

“A majority of Irulas are living in huts in very bad conditions. The commission is of the view that every Irula should get a house under the Indira Awaas Yojana (IAY). The commission will hold discussions with officials of the Puducherry government about the economic plight of the Irulas and the facilities being provided to them. The Centre has been providing a lot of funds and it needs to be ascertained whether it is spent or not. The Irulas come under Below Poverty Line (BPL) category and should be provided with all the facilities,” Mr. Oraon told The Hindu. […]

Source: Irulas of Puducherry may be granted Scheduled Tribe status – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/puducherry/irulas-of-puducherry-may-be-granted-scheduled-tribe-status/article6372331.ece
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:24:37 GMT+0100 (CET)

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The Southern Regional Centre of IGRMS: “A hub for community” at Mysore (Maisuru) – Karnataka

Southern Regional Centre Mysore

The Southern Regional Centre of IGRMS, at Maisuru (Mysore), is the outcome of initiatives of the central government and keen interest of the State Government of Karnataka. The State government has allotted, in the year 2000, one of its prestigious heritage buildings ‘Wellington Lodge’ situated in the heart of the Maisuru (Mysore) city, to establish the Regional Centre of IGRMS. It has started museum activities from 2001 onwards.

The Regional Centre is a hub for community – museum related interactive educational programmes. It provides platforms to various artists/artisan groups from different parts of India to demonstrate aesthetic beauties of their traditional knowledge systems, creative art forms and craft techniques. The Regional Centre organizes periodically exhibitions on various forms of cultural identities, conduct short – term training programme for aspiring people on various traditional art forms and techniques, and organizes varieties of music, dance and theatrical performances of fold, tribal, and classical traditions.

Wellinton Lodge (Mysore)

The Wellington Lodge, situated in the heart of Mysore city, on Irwin Road, is the oldest secular structure having been in existence for over 200 years. This building was earlier occupied by the Duke of Wellington, when he was in political charge of Mysore, during the years 1799-1801 A.D., soon after the fall of Tipu Sultan, the Tiger of Mysore.

The building is constructed using burnt brick in lime mortar. The total area of the site, including the building, is 1,13,365 sft. The area of the compound is 120 meters in length and 88 meters in breadth. The building is two-storied and is a special structure, viewed from all the four sides.

The Government of Karnataka has declared the Wellington Lodge as a State protected Monument in 1991, as per Govt. Notification No.ITY/KMU/87 dated 29.9.1981 under the provisions of the Karnataka Ancient and Historical Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1961.

Source of information: Dr. D.V. Devaraj, former Director, Archaeology & Museums, Mysore.

Source: Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya | इन्दिरा गांधी राष्ट्रीय मानव संग्रहालय
Address: http://igrms.gov.in/aboutus/southern-regional-centre-mysore
Date Visited: Mon Nov 07 2016 19:22:57 GMT+0100 (CET)

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A community whose drumming is associated with Chola, Chera and the Pandya kings – Tamil Nadu

The Hindu, Friday Review, November 03, 2016 | To read the full article and view a larger image, click here >>

Thudumbu and Thudumbattam are played at temple festivals in and around Coimbatore.

We went to Coimbatore for a concert but decided to stay back for a short holiday and ended up doing research on the instrument thudumbu, locally known as jamab.

Thudumbu belongs to the Kovai (Coimbatore) region. It is also known as kidumutti, thidumam, uruti and chera thudumbu.

The origin of the name thudumbu has been attributed to the Thudumbars, a tribal community living in Pollachi, Mettupalayam, Karamadai, Nilgris and Kovai areas. It is learnt that the members of this community used to serve and entertain the Chola, Chera and the Pandya kings and feudal lords,who went for ‘vana bhojana’ in the forests. The thudumbu was also played to chase away the wild animals. […]

Source: Rhythm of celebration – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/features/friday-review/Rhythm-of-celebration/article16091741.ece
Date Visited: Sun Jan 08 2017 19:49:17 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Adivasi Adi Bimb Festivals: Silently but surely bringing the Adivasis of the land to limelight

Ratan Thiyam talks about his special bond with tribal communities and his efforts to showcase their creative side.

Born to parents with a rich legacy of art and culture, barely a year after India had managed to throw off the shackles of colonial rule, Ratan Thiyam had miles to go and missions to fulfil. With inborn orientation towards the arts and aesthetics, Ratan Thiyam has not left out any area of artistic endeavour untried. He is a writer, a poet, a painter, a theatre person adept at everything connected with it. […]

According to him, “Theatre is all about protest, with the highest involvement of aesthetics”. With a love for the underdog, Ratan Thiyam has turned his attention to the ‘world stage’ where his protest is helping to build a congenial atmosphere for the original inhabitants or the Adivasi population of our country. With his highest involvement in aesthetics and his belief in the words of Martin Luther King, “the ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people, but the silence over that by the good people,” he has always been curious to know what kind of art and culture exists among the tribal people. His tryst with them started sometime during the 1970s, when one day he had set off to the hills of Manipur. He climbed hill after hill on a journey of exploration. Fatigued and worn out by sundown, he stood on the threshold of a tribal home, and the boy from Imphal was welcomed with spontaneity. Hot water, steaming food and a warm bed was given to him for the night’s rest, at the cost of the house owner who had to sleep in a make-shift place. […]

“I was struck by their honesty and simplicity. I had the good fortune of seeing a tribal group perform a drama for their leader in which they mimicked him and his pregnant wife with the chief who also joined them in the laughter,” he said. He heard from them the stories of their roots, mythological tales with an original twist of their own. His search to know more about the Adivasis and befriending them is still in his agendas.

He is silently but surely bringing the Adivasis of the land to limelight. Adivasi Adi Bimb Festivals as he has named them, has already been held in several venues of Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, West Bengal, Andaman and Nicobar Islands and recently in Chaibasa in Jharkhand. […]

A number of plays were staged by Adivasi groups and their success lay in the enthusiastic and spontaneous shouts of the audience. […]

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Tribal language and bilingual newspapers: Key findings & conclusions

ANKITA PANDEY, thehoot.org, 20/12/2016

What are the factors that decide whether and where tribal language publications flourish? Some of the answers are surprising. | To read the full article, click here >>

Tribal languages have received insufficient attention in our country. Only a small number of them have managed to register their presence in the world of print media. This article analyses registered tribal language newspapers and examines the conditions that support the growth of tribal languages in print media. Key findings are:

  • Between 1957 and 2015, 340 newspapers were registered with the Registrar of Newspapers for India (RNI) in 34 tribal languages and 48 districts in 13 states.
  • Registered tribal language newspapers accounted for only 0.25 per cent of all newspaper registrations, whereas tribal communities have over the years accounted for at least seven and a half per cent of the country’s population.
  • About 90 per cent of tribal language newspapers were registered in 27 languages of seven North Eastern states.
  • […]
  • A large population size does not necessarily support the growth of tribal language newspapers. The central and eastern states where the bulk of India’s tribes live have very few tribal language newspapers.
  • Only 16 tribal newspapers including nine in Assam, two each in Nagaland and West Bengal and one newspaper each in Chhattisgarh, Tripura and Jharkhand filed annual statements in 2014-15.
  • About 66 tribal newspapers are in circulation at present.

The Eighth Schedule of the Constitution lists 22 languages, including two tribal languages, Bodo and Santhali, that were added in 2004. In 2001, the Census reported 93 tribal languages, including Bodo and Santhali, spoken by more than 10,000 people each. Other sources that do not restrict themselves to languages spoken by more than 10,000 people also show that there are many more tribal languages in India than non-tribal languages. However, the tribal languages are barely represented in the print media. […]

Since 1957, when RNI began registering newspapers, at least one tribal language newspaper was registered in every year, except in 2002, and ten or more tribal language newspapers were registered in 11 years (Figure 1).The period after the Emergency (1978-91) witnessed the most robust growth in tribal language newspapers, with the annual rate of registration being almost twice that of the 1957-77 and 1992-2002 periods. There has been a revival of growth after 2002. […]

Santhali newspapers were registered in four states – Jharkhand (6 registrations), Maharashtra (2), Odisha (6) and West Bengal (8). One newspaper each was registered in 12 other tribal languages including Nagamese and Sadri, which are link languages spoken by tribes. Together the Kuki Chin languages spoken in Mizoram and south Manipur accounted for 64 per cent of all tribal language newspaper registrations in India, even though they constitute less than two per cent of the country’s tribal population (Census, 2011). […]

Periodicity – monthlies have been growing

About 25.6 per cent of all newspapers registered between 1957 and 2015 were dailies. Until 2005 tribal language monthlies accounted for only 29 per cent of newspaper registrations in comparison to 25 per cent of weeklies. But, in recent times (2006-15) the share of monthlies increased to 45.9 per cent compared to 9.4 per cent of weeklies and 29.4 per cent dailies (Figure 7). The resurgence of monthlies suggests that it is difficult to sustain dailies in tribal languages.

Ownership is predominantly private persons
Almost two-thirds of all the tribal newspapers were owned by individuals. Only seven individual owners – one each in West Bengal, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Nagaland, and Tripura and two in Meghalaya – belonged to non-tribal communities. Private publishing companies owned only three per cent of the newspapers (Figure 8).Youth, students’ organisations and political parties owned ten per cent of the registered newspapers. […]

Bi-/Multi-lingual newspapers

A few states have also seen registrations of bi-/multi-lingual tribal newspapers. Unfortunately, RNI does not identify the languages involved in such publications and this has to be inferred from the name of publication and the name and location of the publisher. About 58 bilingual and 16 multilingual newspapers have been registered in the North East. […]

Concluding remarks

Generally tribes do not get sufficient recognition in the mainstream media. The development of media in tribal languages is a step in the direction of developing an environment to nourish the language, culture and heritage. Political autonomy and recognition in a state as one of the primary official languages support the growth of tribal newspapers. […]

Large population size does not necessarily support the growth of tribal language newspapers. The Central and Eastern Indian states where the bulk of India’s tribes live, have very few tribal language newspapers. […]

Source: http://www.thehoot.org/research/special-reports/mapping-tribal-language-newspapers-9860
Address: http://www.thehoot.org/research/special-reports/mapping-tribal-language-newspapers-9860
Date Visited: Sun Jan 08 2017 19:20:30 GMT+0100 (CET)

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The Asurs’ remembrance of their ancestors: A ‘particularly vulnerable’ tribal group –  Bihar, Jharkhand & West Bengal

Prashant Pandey & Premankur Biswas, Indian Express, December 8, 2016 | To view more photos and read the full article, click here >>

Chamru is an Asur, a ‘particularly vulnerable tribal group’ that dominates Sakhuapani’s population of about 2,000 and lives in villages spread over a radius of 10 to 20 km. Besides Jharkhand, members of the tribe live in pockets of Bihar, West Bengal and a few other states. The 2011 Census put the number of Asurs at 22,459 in Jharkhand and 4,129 in Bihar.

The Asurs claim to be descendants of Mahishasur, the buffalo-demon whom Goddess Durga kills after a spirited fight lasting nine nights. It’s this mythology in mainstream Hinduism that’s celebrated in the form of the nine-day-long Durga Puja, but observed as ‘Mahishasur Dasain’ among the Asurs, who hold a period of mourning during which they largely stay indoors.

Chamru says that even when he was a child, though people had their beliefs and biases, nobody attacked them for it, they merely thought they were different. “Those were the days of zamindari. The zamindar of Bishunpur (now the local police station) would ask us to get wood and collect leaves for making pattals for the puja. We would go there, give the zamindar all this and also give him some of our tools. We would then return home before the celebrations began and offer prayers seeking protection from our own ancestors,” says Chamru.

Now as these cultures are seen as offending, Chamru says these are “just beliefs”. “I have heard we are descendants of Mahishasur. That’s all I can tell you. I can’t tell you how our descendants settled down in this part of the country and so on,” he says. […]

Asurs, she says, were once iron smelters, but now the village doesn’t have a smelting unit. Chamru says he used to make small weapons, “but I have forgotten all that now”. According to one of the theories, the Magadh Empire benefited a lot from the weapons the Asurs made. “Their iron does not catch rust. And we know there are many Ashokan-era edicts on iron that haven’t rusted,” says Ashwani Kumar Pankaj, a tribal activist in Ranchi.

Traditionally, Asurs don’t drink cow milk. “We want the calf to have all the milk and grow up strong so that it can be used in the fields,” says Anil Asur, Sushma’s brother. Villagers still don’t drink much milk or tea, happy instead to down a glass of rice beer. […]

Bargi belongs to a group of about 1,000 Asurs, who moved from Jharkhand and Madhya Pradesh in the early 20th Century and work and live near the tea gardens of Jalpaiguri. “My father moved here in 1914 to work for a British tea planter. We have lived here ever since. It’s been more than a century now,” he says.

Jagannath Singh, 67, a social worker who used to work as a primary school teacher at the Carron tea estate school, says the story of the Asurs is like that of most other ‘particularly vulnerable tribal groups‘ of the country, but with a “cruel twist”. “Apart from abject poverty, they also have to deal with social stigma. The Asurs in Jalpaiguri were recognised as a Scheduled Tribe only in 2014, after years of struggle,” says Singh. […]

Source: Meet the Asurs — a marginal tribe that describes Durga as a goddess who enticed Mahishasur | The Indian Express
Address: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/meeting-the-asurs-a-marginal-tribe-in-eastern-india/
Date Visited: Sat Jan 07 2017 13:10:24 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Creating a learning environment which is aesthetically pleasing, cost effective, environment and child friendly at Thulir – Tamil Nadu

Creation of the new School

After innumerable designs, discussions with the teachers and students and changes, we have finally started on the foundations of the classrooms last month! We would like to create an environment which is aesthetically pleasing, cost effective, environment and child friendly while satisfying the government norms.

The campus will be built by the local artisans we have trained over the years and it will use renewable energy as far as possible. […]

A new technique of mud walling – in situ mud concreting – was tried out here. We mixed mud, debris from the well digging, some stones and a small percentage of cement and poured it into bamboo shutters to make the wall. […]

Music and Dance workshop

Shirly and Baby, the founders of Kanavu Gurukula at Wynad visited with their daughter Shanthi from 20th to 23rdOctober and conducted a song and dance workshop. They got all of us to shed our inhibitions and dance.

Music and dance feed our souls and it is a shame that hardly any of us sing or sway to music nowadays. Even adivasi communities are not engaging actively with these art forms but are just becoming passive consumers of it. We hope they will visit regularly and continue these activities. […]

Parents Meeting

We continue to engage with parents, as we strongly believe that an educative process cannot happen in isolation and parents play a critical part in their children’s learning. We had two parents meetings: one in June and one in September.

Parents actively participated in these meetings and they were very keen to know about their child’s academic performance. Teachers engaged them with the works of their children and provided constructive feedback.

In an open discussion, most of the parents expressed immense satisfaction with the school and they were happy about their child’s progress.  The recurring question about children climbing trees was discussed again in this meeting, with some of the parents apprehensive about tree-climbing and others confident about the benefits of it.

We stressed the need to question ourselves as Adivasi parents, whether our negative response to tree climbing is due to the outside urbanised society’s influence; which makes us feel that our way of living or being with nature is “backward/wild” and must change? How do we educate our children to learn the skills of the modern world while not losing the inherent positive qualities of the local community? […]

Source: Newsletter July-October 2016
Address: http://www.thulir.org/wp/2016/11/newsletter-july-october-2016/
Date Visited: Sat Nov 26 2016 12:55:11 GMT+0100 (CET)

Sittilingi is an Adivasi Village in the Dharmapuri District of Tamil Nadu, India. It is in a Valley enclosed by the Kalrayan hills to the East and the Sitteri Hills to the West. There are twenty-one Malayalee (adivasi) hamlets, two Lambadi hamlets and one dalit hamlet here.

The Hill slopes are Reserved Forest areas and the Valley is green.
Source: Thulir | A Centre for Learning at Sittilingi Village
Address: http://www.thulir.org/wp/#place
Date Visited: Sat Nov 26 2016 13:04:02 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Discussing the scope for an Adivasi agenda: Conference on indigenous knowledge, sacred sites & eco-feminism at Jadavpur University (February 2017) – West Bengal

Themes covered by Prof. Dr. Marine Carrin at Jadavpur University (Kolkata) in February 2017

  • Conference 1: Indigenous Forests: the colonial legacy
  • Conference 2: How Santals speak about places?  The making of sacred places.
  • Conference 3: Indigenous knowledge as reinvented by men, healers, women and children.
  • Conference 4: Sacred sites, eco-feminism, global warming and religious environmentalism: the scope for an Adivasi agenda?

I am also giving a paper at ADRI Silver jubilee in Patna, late March on: The imagining of alternative citizenship in Jharkhand and another in Ranchi I have not yet given a title but that will cover the question of the sustainability of rights.

Source: personal message by Prof. Dr. Marine Carrin, Director of Research Emeritus at CNRS, Unverité Jean-Jaurès Toulouse  (9 February 2017)

Contact

  • Information Office Ph: 2457 – 2227
  • Main Campus, 188, Raja S.C. Mallick Rd, Kolkata 700032. Ph:+9133-24146666
  • Salt Lake Campus, Plot No.8, Salt Lake Bypass, LB Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098.Ph: +9133-2335 5215

Source: Welcome to the official website of Jadavpur University.
Address: http://www.jaduniv.edu.in/
Date Visited: Thu Feb 09 2017 12:21:02 GMT+0100 (CET)

 

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Educational package for children of the Kadar community: Initiating children into formal education easily – Kerala & Tamil Nadu

K. PRADEEP, The Hindu, KOCHI, July 19, 2012 | To read the full story, click here >>

An educational package for pre-primary children of the Kadar tribe incorporating their own language will be distributed in 22 anganwadis this week. Dr. Amitha Bachan, the man behind the project says that it will help initiate the children into formal education easily

They are not like any other children. These kids of the primitive Kadar tribes grow up in a world of their own, a world of the jungle, animals, birds, rivers. They speak a dialect of their own, are brought up in a dissimilar culture. Their contact with the ‘official’ language of the region is limited perhaps to a few common words. And their exposure to the outside world very restricted. […]

When these children begin their tryst with education, at the pre-primary stage in the ‘anganwadis’ near their settlements, they find themselves lost. The language used for instruction and communication here is frighteningly strange. The process flows on to the primary level too. Unable to fully comprehend classroom teaching and the activities, unable to read the language taught or understand the text books properly, majority of these children drop out of school.

Sensing the need for an educational package that incorporates tribal language with the regular teaching methods, the Western Ghats Hornbill Foundation (WGHF), in association with Integrated Child Services Scheme of the Athirappilly panchayat, has come out with a set of two thematic books, a workbook, puzzles and educative cards that is based on the language and knowledge of the Kadar tribe.

The concept has been developed on the thought that use of tribal language in the initial years can go a long way to make them comfortable with the process of education. “The first language taught should be what they are familiar with, their own language. Through this they must first acquire knowledge of their own culture, ethnicity. The official lingo can be introduced gradually as this is essential for their integration into mainstream schools and the society at large,” informs Dr. Amitha Bachan K. H., Director (Research) WGHF and Assistant Professor (Botany), MES Asmabi College, Kodungallur.

The Kadar tribes are endemic to the Annamalais in the Western Ghats. They inhabit 24 settlements of which 20 are in Kerala and four in neighbouring Tamil Nadu. The majority of them occupy around eight settlements in Vazhachal. Till the last century they were unfamiliar to the outside world. This non-agricultural, seasonally nomadic, tribe live by collecting non-timber forest produce like honey, wild nutmeg etc. Construction of dams, emergence of plantations has hugely displaced their habitat pushing them to the verge of extinction. […]

Documentation of the Kadar tribes has not been done earlier. […]”

The illustrations in the book are all based on photographs taken from the tribal settlements and surroundings. So, in the two books you have commonplace objects, characters, animals, birds and things hand-drawn, in bright colours, child-friendly images. The illustrations are by three children Ali Akbar, Vishnu P. V. and Anish C. S. The concept of this educational package has been developed by Amitha Bachan, Shajan M. P., Fasila P. K., and Anitha K. T. Given in these books are the words in tribal language with Malayalam and English translation. […]

The Western Ghats Hornbill Foundation has been supported in this endeavour by the Forest Department, Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (A Tree) and Centre for Environment and Development, Thiruvananthapuram.

We are now working on field guides on books, trees, flowers for tribes and nature lovers that will have a pictorial index. We have also started work on a nature education series books for senior children based on indigenous knowledge,” says Amitha Bachan.

Source: Lessons through their language – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/article3657900.ece?homepage=true
Date Visited: Sun Nov 27 2016 22:29:56 GMT+0100 (CET)

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India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Rajasthan & Sikkim

There are 29 states and 7 Union territories in the country. Union Territories are administered by the President through an Administrator appointed by him/her. | Learn more >>

States and Capitals

  1. Rajasthan (Jaipur)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  2. Sikkim (Gangtok)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>

Note

States and Union Territories do not generally account for persons with “tribal roots”, unless they are home to people recognized as members of a  Scheduled Tribe (ST) under the constitution of India. Yet countless people with “tribal roots” live in metropolitan and touristic areas such as Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Goa, Kolkata, Mumbai. Their ranks include students, professionals, scientists and employees working for government agencies, educational institutions, banks and businesses.

While an educated person with tribal roots may be lauded for being assimilated as “main stream”, many others remain unnoticed even by their neighbours and local authorities. Their ranks include vulnerable boys and girls – many among them working as live-in maids – who “simply disappear” from their villages without a trace. They are being lured in growing numbers, often with false promises of a “good job” in the city. | Rescue and rehabilitation measures for victims of human trafficking and child abuse >>

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Video | Kalamandir (Jamshedpur) founded in 1997: Preservation, conservation and dissemination of art and cultural heritage – Jharkhand

Published on Aug 8, 2015

The initial videos of Kalamandir, describing its objectives, main and interest in preservation, conservation and dissemination of art and cultural heritage.

Kalamandir has traveled a long way since 1997. This is just to remember all our old acquaintance and friends and our team efforts.

Source: Kalamandir – The Celluloid Chapter Art Foundation – YouTube
Address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUWISh49GWg
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 15:59:37 GMT+0100 (CET)

Contact Kalamandir

8-10, N Road, Bistupur, Jamshedpur

Phone: 0657-2320109
Fax: 0657-2320457

E-mail: kalamandir.jsr@gmail.com
or kala.nrm@gmail.com

Website: www.kala-mandir.org

BIPONI Handicraft Store

8-10, N Road, Bistupur, Jamshedpur

Phone – 0657-2320457
Fax: 0657- 2320457

E-mail: biponishgjsr@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Biponi?ref=hl

Amadubi-Panijiya Rural Tourism Centre

Gramin Paryatan Vikas Samity
Raotora Road, Panijiya, Amadubi
Dhalbhumgarh, East Singhbhum, Jharkhand

Office: 2320109
Sujit Das: 9234417953

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Kalagram?ref=hl

Source: Contact Kalamandir
Address: http://www.kala-mandir.org/web/contact.php
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 16:12:43 GMT+0100 (CET)

NGO revives tribal art

NILANJANA GHOSH CHOUDHURY, The Telegraph (Calcutta), November 18 , 2012

Jamshedpur, Dec. 28: In an attempt to promote village tourism and tribal art, Jamshedpur-based NGO Kalamandir will launch specially designed calendars and greeting cards this New Year | To read the full story, click here >>

“Amadubi is a place where a city dweller would get everything — scenic beauty, greenery and a vibrant tribal life. It has the potential to become a good tourism destination. Keeping this in mind we have decided to rope in local artists to relate their stories through Pyatkar paintings,” said Roma Sohi, a senior official at Kalamandir. […]

“Pyatkar is one of the most traditional forms of art in Jharkhand. So, why not use the form to say what we want to promote about this village and the region?” said Sohi. […]

The other village, which finds a mention in this calendar is Deuridih in Kharsawan. Considered to be the birthplace of Kharsawan Chhau, this small hamlet has made it to the list of villages having the potential to attract tourism. “Though we have named and given descriptive details about Deuridih in our introductory message in the calendar, no images of Chhau has been provided as the dance form today is universally known. Pyatkar is something that needs a platform to be promoted,” added Sohi. […]

In the coming days Kalamandir would also conduct trips for school and college students of the steel city to these villages so that they could be made aware of the traditional art forms and the essence of tribal rural life. […]

The original paintings were made using natural vegetable dyes, colours extracted from flowers, bark of trees and yellow clay brought from the nearby rivers. Done up in bright designs and colour schemes, over a dozen paintings have been selected for the calendar but there are only five painting depicted on the greeting cards.

Source: The Telegraph – Calcutta (Kolkata) | Jharkhand | NGO revives tribal art
Address: https://www.telegraphindia.com/1071229/jsp/jharkhand/story_8721225.jsp
Date Visited: Sun Feb 05 2017 10:14:04 GMT+0100 (CET)

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