The “master honey hunters” of Wayanad’s forests: Kattunayikka tribesmen’s involvement for sustainable honey harvesting – Kerala

K R Rajeev, Times of India, May 18, 2017  | To read the full article, click here >>

KOZHIKODE: Heavy summer rain has turned out to be manna from the skies for tribal honey hunters in Wayanad, the leading wild honey producing region in the state. The massive blooming of forest flora after the summer rain has given hopes of a bountiful harvest in the ongoing season that extends till September. […]

“We are looking forward to good harvest of over 20,000kg of wild honey as forest trees like Maruthu (Terminalia paniculata), Venthekku (Lagerstroemia microcarpa) Chadachi (Grewia tiliaefolia), Thanni (Terminalia bellerica) etc have bloomed in abundance this year following summer rain,” said OA Ramakrishnan, president of the Sultan Bathery Scheduled Tribes Cooperative Society at Kallur, the largest tribal society in the state. […]

The society had a dull season last year and could procure only 12,000kg, following adverse findings in the tests done by food safety authorities. Society officials said that subsequent tests conducted in laboratory in Mysuru had confirmed that the honey was of good quality.

“Timely summer showers saved us this season. We feared that this year’s scorching summer would dry up the honey yield and our main source of income. But, summer showers have become a blessing,” Mathan, a tribesman from the Ponkuzhi colony said.

Secretary of Thirunelly Scheduled Tribes Cooperative Society Sunoj EG, said that they have collected 5,000kg of honey and hope to collect over 8,000 more by the end of the season. Last year, the society had collected only 6,000kg.

The Kattunayikka tribesmen are master honey hunters, who make a living by collecting wild honey and other forest produce. Wild honey is mainly collected from the hives of rock bees on the branches of tall trees. The tribal wild honey collectors, who venture into the forests in groups of four or five members, gather honey by climbing the tall trees. The bees are driven away with the help of a smoker and the honey part of the hive is cut off.

State forest department, which procures and markets honey through eco-development committees inside Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, had taken steps to ensure sustainable harvesting of honey from forests.

Source: Heatwave in kozhikode: Summer rain ensures bountiful harvest for tribal honey hunters | Kozhikode News – Times of India
Address: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kozhikode/summer-rain-ensures-bountiful-harvest-for-tribal-honey-hunters/articleshow/58726438.cms
Date Visited: Tue May 23 2017 14:25:30 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Suggested reading on thebetterindia.com:

Meet the Honey Hunters of the Nilgiris – the Men Who Risk Their Lives for Your Sweet Jar of Honey >>

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Posted in Bees and honey, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, Maps, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Press snippets, Seasons and festivals, Southern region, Success story, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Tagged | Comments Off on The “master honey hunters” of Wayanad’s forests: Kattunayikka tribesmen’s involvement for sustainable honey harvesting – Kerala

Combining traditional biodiversity knowledge with “livelihood enhancement”: The SBI Life Adivasi youth skill development programme for Wayanad – Kerala

E.M. Manoj, The Hindu, Kalpetta, November 28, 2015  | To read the full article, click here >>

The SBI Life Adivasi youth skill development programme, a project being implemented jointly by the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) here and SBI Life Insurance Company, Kerala, for selected tribal youths in the district, has set a model in tribal youth empowerment in the State.

The project is aimed at equipping participants with livelihood skills. […]

The topics of the one-year training programme, include basics of self-employment such as bamboo-based income generation programmes, legal awareness, attempting competitive examinations for various government jobs, command over English language, computing, software skills and training to sharpen their own traditional biodiversity knowledge. […]

What attracts the tribal youth to the project is the multi-subject training programme, Nandakumar, an engineering diploma holder from Paniya community said. As the programme is being conducted on weekends, it enables the working youth to attend, he adds.

Source: MSSRF sets a model in tribal empowerment – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/mssrf-sets-a-model-in-tribal-empowerment/article7926181.ece
Date Visited: Fri Mar 31 2017 20:33:44 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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India’s tribal communities portrayed by leading periodicals and internet portals – Press roundup

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For an up-to-date press roundup, type “Adivasi welfare”, “tribe citizen journalism”, “tribal youth technology”, “tribal women”, “Warli tribal art”, “Nigiris tribe heritage”, “rural education Chhattisgarh”, “tribe grassroots journalism”, “vulnerable tribal community”, “Santal education”, “Andaman Nicobar tribal tourism” or similar search terms into the search window seen below:

Publications included in the present Google custom search engine

  1. The Better India
  2. Deccan Herald
  3. The Economic Times
  4. Frontline Magazine
  5. Hardnewsmedia.com
  6. The Hindu
  7. Hindustantimes.com
  8. The Indian Express
  9. Kafila.org
  10. Newindianexpress.com
  11. Livemint.com
  12. Openthemagazine.com
  13. Outlook India.com
  14. Sanctuaryasia.com
  15. Scroll.in
  16. Tehelka.com
  17. The Telegraph Calcutta
  18. The Times of India
  19. The Week / week.manoramaonline.com
  20. More online newspapers

Suggest another Indian periodical for inclusion here >>

Posted in Accountability, Assimilation, Commentary, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Eco tourism, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Health and nutrition, History, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Press snippets, Regions of India, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Success story, Tips | Comments Off on India’s tribal communities portrayed by leading periodicals and internet portals – Press roundup

“Learning to love the city in Northeast India” – IIAS Newsletter

The Newsletter 77 Summer 2017

iias_nl77_summer_2017_screenshotLearning to love the city in Northeast India

The rapid urbanization of India’s Northeast frontier1 is one of the most crucial transformations the area has witnessed, yet it remains relatively understudied. In just a few decades a large number of the inhabitants have become urban dwellers in one of the frontier cities, or migrants in cities in the rest of India and abroad. Urban areas in the frontier have diverse histories and some common experiences. Colonisation, resource extraction, stations for supply, and militarisation are some of the shared features. These processes have persisted in postcolonial India along with the growth in administrative quarters and buildings (and cars) for the bureaucrats of newly created political units (new federal states and autonomous districts), new military installations and housing, and population growth from migration for those seeking work, refuge, and education. Despite this history, urban environments are rarely part of imaginations of the frontier, especially in the production and circulation of images and the stereotypes of plantations, jungle insurgency, spectacular topography, and colourfully dressed ethnic minority communities. In this Focus section we explore the urban environments in the Northeast frontier – India’s ‘unruly borderland’2 – as crucial sites in their own right, and as sites in which to experiment with different ways of researching the region. […]

Two dynamics can be considered, in addition to just the size of a settlement: urban population growth and municipal expansion. The 2011 census recorded extensive growth in urban populations. The percentage of the overall population living in urban areas in each of the Northeast states in 2011 was as follows (with the increase since 2001 in brackets): Mizoram 52% (+3%), Manipur 31% (+6%), Nagaland 29% (+12%), Tripura 26% (+9%), Sikkim 25% (+14%), Arunachal Pradesh 23% (+2%), Meghalaya 20% (+1%) and Assam 14% (+2%), compared to a national average of 31% (3%). […]

Historically, city-level governance, compared to state and district level, has always been weak in India; an issue further complicated in the Northeast by overlapping layers of authority (including traditional decision making bodies), and until recently there has been little incentive to expand the territory under municipal authority.

This, however, is changing. There are now new incentives to enlarge and/or create municipal areas in the frontier. The Ministry of Urban Development has a number of flagship schemes.  […]

In the frontier, neighbourhoods, public buildings, commercial areas, houses, slums, parks, ceasefire camps, barracks and memorials all tell stories of past and present relationships of power and violence. […]

The search for exceptional spaces in urban areas also needs to account for normalcy, and indeed the unstable ground upon which ‘normal’ and ‘exceptional’ can be understood in the Northeast. Parks, malls, theatres, cemeteries, bus stations, are important sites where people live out their lives, sometimes even – in the case of the gardens on U-Chiyok in Kakching – in full view of acres of military infrastructure. […]

Urban areas in the Northeast are covered in images and text that reflect a lived cosmopolitanism – and it’s limits – that both accompanies and challenges dominant ways of understanding the region and its component parts. […]

In urban areas attempts to articulate and enforce acceptable sensory behaviour characterises relationships between ethnic communities, often drawing a line between indigenous and migrant, or dominant and marginal, with the latter the subject of grievances for the physical, sonic, visual, and olfactory affect on local space; such as the smell from the food different communities cook and eat, or the noise from particular religious worship and festivals. Senses also affect relationships among communities along class lines; for instance, poorer areas are perceived as ‘smelly’ by some urban residents because of the rubbish, the industry (metal works, incineration, animal slaughter), and noise owing to overcrowded dwellings and raucous behaviour often linked to rural sensibilities and alcohol consumption, while wealthier areas are imagined as quiet, odour free, clean, and ‘decent’. […]

The Newsletter

The Newsletter is a free academic publication produced three times a year by the International Institute for Asian Studies. With a worldwide readership of about 50,000 The Newsletter is the premier Asian Studies forum for Asia scholars to share commentary and opinion; research essays; book, journal and website reviews; and announcements of events, projects and conferences, with colleagues in academia and beyond. | Take a free subscription

Source: The Newsletter 77 Summer 2017 | International Institute for Asian Studies
Address: http://iias.asia/the-newsletter/newsletter-77-summer-2017
Date Visited: Fri Jun 16 2017 18:57:54 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Tribal voices worth listening to: On culture, land rights, employment, education and indigenous languages – Andaman, Kerala & Odisha

Dongria Kondh woman in millet field, Orissa, India © Toby Nicholas/Survival

Unless we affirm our culture and right and language, we won’t live. Our colour is good, our language is good, our art is good, our way of living is good. If we can respect your religion and your practices, why can’t you respect ours?’ – G. Thenadikulam, Wayanad District

‘We say, ‘you don’t have to take care of us. We’ll take care of ourselves. We’ll lead our lives the way we know.’ – Arjun Chandi, Majhi Kondh

Land is what will see us through, not only us but our children. We will not give up our land for anything in this world. If we give our land for mining it will not make our lives any better. In fact, we will end up with no jobs, no land and no home.’ – S. Pollanna, Ananthagiri

‘[The Jarawa’s] knowledge of indigenous plants, herbs, diseases, and creatures of the jungle is immense and needs no schooling. No one can really educate them further. It is we, who need to be educated because soon all this knowledge will evaporate, with the immanent danger of the extinction of the tribe.’ – Anvita Abbi, Professor of Linguistics, Jawaharlal Nehru University

Learn more >>

Source: Proud not primitive info – Survival International
Address: http://www.notprimitive.in/not-primitive-info
Date Visited: Mon Apr 24 2017 12:42:34 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Assimilation, Childhood and children, Commentary, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Dress and ornaments, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Misconceptions, Modernity, Names and communities, Nature and wildlife, Networking, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Regions of India, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Southern region, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal identity, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology, Worship and rituals | Tagged | Comments Off on Tribal voices worth listening to: On culture, land rights, employment, education and indigenous languages – Andaman, Kerala & Odisha