Priceless tribal knowledge systems “should become part of the syllabus” – Telangana

S. Harpal Singh, The Hindu, ADILABAD: April 06, 2015  | To read the full article, click here >>

The tribal knowledge systems, shared by the Gond, Pardhan, Kolam and Thotti Adivasis in this district, have originated from centuries of observation of nature, especially the behaviour of birds and animals. Knowledge has been passed from one generation to the other solely by oral tradition, depending largely on observation by the younger generation.

“The knowledge systems will be relevant until the Adivasis continue to be an agrarian society and do not part with their culture, custom and tradition. They will continue to be priceless, literally and figuratively,” observes Harsh Satya, of the Centre for Exact Humanities, IIIT, Hyderabad, who is doing research on the knowledge systems of the tribes of Adilabad.

“Present-day education is distancing our children from our ethos,” sums up Urvetha Ramu, a Gond elder from Rampur in Utnoor mandal on the knowledge systems becoming more and more irrelevant in the tribal milieu. “Documentation is necessary for the benefit of future generations,” opines Utnoor B.Ed. college Principal Mesram Manohar.

At least one chapter on Adivasi people, their lifestyle and knowledge systems should become part of the syllabus from high school onwards. The books of anthropologist Christopher von Furer-Haimendorf on the ‘Gonds of Adilabad’ and ‘Among the Gonds of Adilabad’ written by Sethu Madhav Rao Pagdi should be made available to tribal students,” he adds. Professor Haimendorf published a series of monographs based on his in-depth studies on the Raj Gonds of Adilabad which was part of the huge volume titled ‘The Aboriginal Tribes of Hyderabad’. The study was done between 1945 and 1947 when most of the original culture and tradition of the Adivasis was intact.

Source: Knowledge system of tribal people faces extinction – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/telangana/knowledge-system-of-tribal-people-faces-extinction/article7072372.ece
Date Visited: Sat Dec 03 2016 12:57:02 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Bhil communities’ success story: Reviving the custom known as “halma” to conserve water – Madhya Pradesh

Ritesh Mishra, Hindustan Times, Indore, 13-3-16

Halma has united tribes people to conserve environment and water

Until now, tribes people have planted more than 11,000 trees in 110 villages, repaired more than 250 hand pumps and dug more than three dozen big ponds in the region, under the drive.

More than 10,000 Bhil tribes people from more than 300 villages will gather at Hathipawa hill, about 1.5 km from district headquarters on March 14 and 15 to take a pledge for the cause. […]

The drive started in 2005, when a group of Bhil social activists decided to take up the cause, said Harsh Chauhan, one of five people who started the drive under a banner called Shivganga Abhiyan.

“Youngster told us that the biggest problem was decreasing forest cover and lack of water in their villages and since then we have started the drive,” he said.

Halma is an ancient tradition of the Bhils where tribes people gather at a place to discuss problems face by the community.

Chauhan said the drive has been going on in more than 800 villages in the two districts and more than 20,000 Bhils have planted trees to conserve environment and water.

“We were earlier suffering from lack of water but now due to the drive we have taken up many initiatives to increase the water level in the village,” said Surti Bai, who tours the district to spread the message of halma.

Source: Bhil tribes revive old tradition to conserve forest and water | indore | Hindustan Times
Address: http://www.hindustantimes.com/indore/bhil-tribes-revive-old-tradition-to-conserve-forest-and-water/story-hAI84PTrx0MNF6bFXnuxaJ.html
Date Visited: Sat Jan 07 2017 12:55:20 GMT+0100 (CET)

Book review “In defence of livelihood” by AMIYA KUMAR BAGCHI in Frontline, Volume 19 – Issue 10, May 11-24, 2002 (India’s National Magazine from the publishers of THE HINDU)
Landscapes and Lives: Environmental Dispatches on Rural India by Mukul Sharma; New Delhi: Oxford University Press; pages xi+234, Rs.475.

[…] GRASSROOTS movements of people are not merely reactive and kindled only at points of resistance against oppression by other humans. They can also build new institutions, construct new structures, and find new ways of living to escape poverty and find some of the freedom that is every woman’s birthright. While big dams almost invariably lead to displacement, Indians have used small dams or bunds all over the country to store rainwater or the run-off from hill slopes, and used them for irrigation, afforestation and soil conservation. On October 28, 1988, a small dam and ponds for holding rainwater were constructed in the village of Sato in Bihar’s Gumla district which lies about 123 kilometres north-west of Ranchi. The assured supply of water and security against soil erosion and landslips has made the Urao [Oraon] community of Sato now regard October 28 as their real independence day.

In Madhya Pradesh, the inhabitants of Gainda and neighbouring villages, in the district of Jhabua, have used halma, a traditional institution for collective labour, to construct numerous civil works that cater to the needs of villagers, with financial support from the government under the Integrated Rural Development Programme (IRDP) scheme. In Ralegan Siddhi, Maharashtra, villagers under the charismatic leadership of Anna Hazare have transformed their habitat into a green, prosperous oasis in the middle of a dry region. Not only have they regenerated the forest or grass cover by means of a ban on the felling of trees followed by extensive replanting; with higher productivity, they have adopted a series of innovations which have in turn raised their earning power and improved their quality of life. “They have grafted the drip irrigation system, solar panels and gobar gas plants” (p. 128). […]

Source: In defence of livelihood
Address: http://www.frontline.in/static/html/fl1910/19100740.htm
Date Visited: Sun Jan 15 2017 10:13:03 GMT+0100 (CET)

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“Real history is created by ordinary people”: Mahashweta Devi (1926-2016), a writer who became a voice of marginalised communities

Mahashweta Devi, a writer who became a voice of marginalised communities

DTE Staff, Thursday 28 July 2016 | To read the full article, click here >>

Mahashweta Devi was not just an onlooker, but a responsible representative of the downtrodden and the ignored population of India

She always believed that the real history is created by ordinary people. For her, the endless source of inspiration for writing used to lie in “amazingly noble human beings” and their sufferings. Bengali litterateur and activist Mahashweta Devi, who breathed her last today in Kolkata, has been fighting against social injustice ever since she started holding a pen for a purpose.

Mahashweta Devi was not just an onlooker, but a responsible representative of the subaltern, the downtrodden and the ignored population of the country. It is through her fierce writing that millions of tribal people in India could manifest their misery. This leading Bengali fiction writer and an eminent social activist wrote extensively on emaciated existence of the most marginalised and dispossessed of our people. Her indictment of the society “for the indignity it heaps on its most oppressed constituents” has always been strong. […]

Mahashweta Devi had thrown herself into the fight to reclaim basic rights of the deprived lot and make them self-reliant. She walked her way through remote villages and deserts in search of oral history and folklore. Her “impractical sincerity” towards collecting data for her stories is reflected in each of her creations. […]

Her work with the Sabars, a de-notified tribal community in the Purulia district of West Bengal, earned her the sobriquet, “The Mother of the Sabars“. As a social worker in the domain of tribal welfare, she rendered her service to the West Bengal Oraon Welfare Society and the All Indian Vandhua Liberation Morcha. She was also the founding member of Aboriginal United Association.

Above all, she would be remembered for founding India’s first organisation for bonded labourers in 1980 that gave thousands of them an organised platform for raising voice against forced labour. […]

Source: Mahashweta Devi, a writer who became a voice of marginalised communities
Address: http://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/mahashweta-devi-a-writer-who-became-a-voice-of-marginalised-communities-55093
Date Visited: Tue Nov 29 2016 20:01:22 GMT+0100 (CET)

Indian Express, New Delhi  Updated: July 28, 2016

Acclaimed writer and social activist Mahasweta Devi has died at the age of 90. […]

She has won both the Sahitya Akademi and Jnanpith awards for literary excellence. She is also a recipient of the Ramon Magsaysay award and the Padma Vibhushan, the country’s second-highest civilian honour.

She began writing in the 60s, moved by the everyday realities she saw around herself in rural Bengal. At that point of time, Devi used to teach in a college on the outskirts of the city of Kolkata. Many of her works have also been the basis of films.

Her works include ‘Aranyer Adhikar’, ‘Chotti Munda evam Tar Tir’, ‘Rudali’, ‘Kulaputra’ and ‘Agnigarbha.’

Source: Mahasweta Devi, acclaimed writer and social activist, dies at 90 | The Indian Express
Address: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/mahasweta-devi-acclaimed-writer-and-social-activist-dies-at-90-2940584/
Date Visited: Tue Nov 29 2016 20:03:42 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Recipe festivals organised by Living Farms: How to benefit from meals made with locally grown produce | Odisha

Why Odisha’s Tribal Women Are Returning to Their Natural Roots for Guidance on Food

Written by Rakhi Ghosh for Women’s Feature Service (WFS) and republished here in arrangement with WFS |  Read the full article and view more photos on thebetterindia.com >>

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Slideshow | National seminar on ‘The importance of the Community Museum for the Education and the Development of the Santals’ – West Bengal

The National seminar on ‘The importance of the Community Museum for the Education and the Development of the Santals’  that was organized with the support of the Anthropological Survey of India (AnSI) has ended with a successful note on 8th December 2016 at RSV school.  The prominent personalities like Prof. Sushanta Dattagupta, former Vice-chancellor, Visva-Bharati; Prof. Ranjit Bhattacharya, former director of AnSI; Dr. Kakali Chakraborty, Dy, director of AnSI; Dr. Gurupada Saren, IGNOU, New Delhi; Dr. Clement Saren, Ranchi; Mr. Innocent Soren, Kolkata, Fr. David Soloman, Dumka, Mrs. Khukumoni  Hansda, women group leader from the village museum, Prof. Kumkum Bhattacharya, Visva-Bharati, Dr. Martin Kämpchen, Santiniketan  and many others delivered their thoughtful insights to the audience.

The paper of Prof. Tone Bleie, Tromso University was read out in absentia. Due to unavoidable circumstances the Arichali Mela (Santal cultural fair) was cancelled.

Source: Boro Baski by email 11 December 2016

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“We want to change the concept of tribal songs”: Reaching out to present-day music buffs – Jharkhand

ARTI S. SAHULIYAR, The Telegraph (Calcutta), Thursday , December 15 , 2011 | To read the full story, click here >>

Call it the sounds of change. Love it or hate it, folk musicians of Jharkhand are using non-tribal instruments such as the keyboard along with traditional ones such as dhol, mandar and nagada to jazz up their ageless repertoire.

Chutia-based Arun Nayak Mukund, with 10 more tribal musicians, is trying to fuse “modern elements” into indigenous numbers and woo the youth. He claims he does not care if purists scoff at him as the end result is “very melodious”. […]

“For the past one month, I started using the keyboard to showcase Nagpuri folk songs. It brings out the rhythm in vocals and tunes. The lyrics sound appealing and melodious. At the same time, we aren’t abandoning tribal musical instruments that are our mainstays,” Mukund said, calling himself the first tribal to do so. […]

“Something new need not be something bad. Now, I’m using the keyboard in all the events I am invited to, within the state and outside, in my recent concerts in Delhi and Himachal Pradesh,” he said.

Flautist Kamlesh Kacchap added that there was no harm if new elements were added to tribal folk music.

“Unless some changes are made, we will lose our place among the present-day music buffs,” he added.

He admitted that only using tribal instruments had no mass appeal. […]

The group has come out with 10 Nagpuri albums in fusion form as well. “We are getting a good response from music lovers. The music arrangement, beats and rhythms are different,” said another flautist Madhu Mansuri Hasmukh.

He also placed popularity over generic purity. […]

However Dilip Toppo, a well-known tribal artist associated with folk art groups, begs to differ. “These musicians are hurrying the process of change. They are interfering with tribal music by tampering with its roots,” he said. […]

Source: Tribal music keys in fuse fare
Address: http://www.telegraphindia.com/1111215/jsp/odisha/story_14882797.jsp#.WDtMdzVaFAz
Date Visited: Sun Nov 27 2016 22:14:46 GMT+0100 (CET)

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India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Nagaland, Odisha, Punjab & Puducherry

There are 29 states and 7 Union territories in the country. Union Territories are administered by the President through an Administrator appointed by him/her. | Learn more >>

States and Capitals

  1. Nagaland (Kohima)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  2. Odisha (Bhubaneshwar)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  3. Punjab (Chandigarh)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>

Union Territories and Capitals

  1. Puducherry (Puducherry)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>

Note

Some States and Union Territories may not acknowledge the presence of any community recognized as Scheduled Tribe (ST). Yet people from tribal communities now also reside in metropolitan areas, either as (poor) work migrants such as craftsmen or labourers; or (as in the case of educated Adivasis) as students, researchers and professionals: persons with “tribal roots” yet affiliated with India’s government and private institutions such as banks, the mass media and other major companies. They are bound to be more assimilated, even “invisible”, than those who remain attached to their ancestral lands.

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Bold patterned artworks that tell a story: The colours and lines of Aboriginal art – Rajasthan & Australia

Neena Bhandari, The Hindu, October 15, 2016 | To read the full article, click here >>

The colours and lines of Aboriginal art in Australia’s outback take the author back to the deserts of her birthplace in Rajasthan

In the grainy red sand, Anangu Aboriginal artist Sarah Dalby, 42, glides her fingers to draw a collection of symbols to demonstrate how the Aborigines have been passing knowledge about their land, culture and traditions from one generation to the next. It is a warm spring afternoon in Yulara, the resort town in Australia’s Red Centre desert, and I am in the town square for a 90-minute Maruku Arts dot painting workshop. […]

Symbolism, manifest in Aboriginal paintings, plays an important role in illustrating the Anangu’s (Aboriginal people from the western and central deserts of Australia) connectedness to the land and the life it supports. The bold patterned artworks tell a story, mostly an interpretation of Tjukurpa (the law and stories of ancestors) that the Aborigines have followed for more than 40,000 years, making this the oldest continuing culture in the world.

As Dalby carefully carves the symbols, the workshop coordinator Saha Joses explains their significance and translates the words from Pitjatjantjara, the Anangu language. Minyma (women) traditionally had piti (wooden bowl) in which they carried their babies and used the wana (digging stick) to protect themselves and collect mai wiru (bush tucker) such as kampurarpa (bush tomatoes), arnguli (plum), mangata (quandong), tjala (honey ants) and maku (witchetty grubs — the larvae of the Cossid Moth). Wati (men) carried a kali (boomerang), kulata (spears), miru (spear thrower), tjutinypa (club) to hunt malu (kangaroo), kalaya (emu) and other fauna.

Dalby’s eyes sparkle with approval. Painting workshops such as this help bridge cultural and language barriers. […]

I read and re-read the sheet of Aboriginal graphic symbols with their meanings and scan the palette of acrylic paints (originally, the Aborigines sourced colours from local materials), easels, brushes and thin pencil-sized sticks with a flattened tip, which we are told, can be used to paint the dots. My thoughts travel back in time to the Thar desert in Rajasthan. Bold reds, blacks and yellows added a magical charm to the barren landscape of my birth. I begin with a tali (sand dune), the most prominent feature of any desert, gradually trying to capture the magic and mystery, while losing myself in the intoxicating charm of the red earth. […]

Dalby is one of 800 artists who form the collective Maruku Arts, owned and operated by the Anangu. It endeavours to keep their culture alive for future generations and provides an important form of income for artists like Dalby living in remote communities.[…]

Neena Bhandari, Sydney-based journalist, is president of the Foreign Correspondents’ Association (Australia & South Pacific).

Source: Neena Bhandari uses Australian aboriginal art to travel back in time and space – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/neena-bhandari-uses-australian-aboriginal-art-to-travel-back-in-time-and-space/article9219895.ece?homepage=true
Date Visited: Sat Nov 26 2016 13:29:02 GMT+0100 (CET)

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“Promote your International Museum Day activities on our world map”: International Museum Day 2017 – International Council of Museums

icon-2017-screenshot-contested-histories-31-12-16

Screenshot – click on the image for more information

The theme

Each year, ICOM chooses a socially relevant theme for International Museum Day (IMD).

The theme chosen for 2017 is “Museums and contested histories: Saying the unspeakable in museums“.

History is a vital tool for defining a given people’s identity, and each of us defines ourselves through important and fundamental historic events. Contested histories are unfortunately not isolated traumatic events. These histories, which are often little known or misunderstood, resonate universally, as they concern and affect us all.

Museum collections offer reflections of memories and representations of history. This day will therefore provide an opportunity to show how museums display and depict traumatic memories to encourage visitors to think beyond their own individual experiences.

By focusing on the role of museums as hubs for promoting peaceful relationships between people, this theme highlights how the acceptance of a contested history is the first step in envisioning a shared future under the banner of reconciliation. 

By mediating and expressing multiple points of view, museums play a role in peacefully addressing traumatic histories – while still sharing knowledge of the past and giving it meaning to help us understand the world today. Museums therefore become tools for teaching universal values and help create a common destiny among different, peaceful geopolitical spaces.

This theme therefore highlights the significant contribution of museums in modern society. Museums ask fundamental questions about any society by providing tools that encourage critical reflection on the issues of memory that shape it or tear it apart. Using a variety of museum methods and different ways of displaying contested histories offers tools for the critical appropriation and acceptance of the past and the establishment of a dialogue to help reconcile memories.

Regarding the IMD 2017 theme

To help you to deal with this particularly tricky yet really inspiring subject, ICOM set up a scientific committee of acknowledged experts on the subject.

Please, don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions:imd@icom.museum

Source: The theme
Address: http://network.icom.museum/international-museum-day/imd-2017/the-theme/
Date Visited: Sat Dec 31 2016 23:49:21 GMT+0100 (CET)

International Museum Day- ICOM

Every year since 1977 International Museum Day is organised worldwide around May 18.

This day is an occasion to raise awareness on how important museums are in the development of society.

ICOM Advisory Committee organises the theme of this event that, given the high number of countries involved, lasts a day, a weekend, a week or even a month.

From America to Oceania including Africa, Europe and Asia, this international event has confirmed its popularity.

These recent years, International Museum Day has been experiencing its highest involution with almost 30,000 museums that organised activities in more than 120 countries.

Museums, promote your International Museum Day activities on our world map.
Register at
http://imd.museu.ms

International Museum Day website >>

Source: International Museum Day- ICOM
Address: http://icom.museum/events/international-museum-day/
Date Visited: Thu Sep 08 2016 18:09:22 GMT+0200 (CEST)

The International Council of Museums works for society and its development. It is committed to ensuring the conservation, and protection of cultural goods. | Learn more >>

Source: ICOM Missions- ICOM
Address: http://icom.museum/the-organisation/icom-missions/
Date Visited: Thu Sep 08 2016 18:16:15 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Discover more possibilities here: Visit a museum collection in India >>

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In memoriam: Dr. Nicolaas Nobel (Utrecht, 12 May 1933 – Noordwijk, 29 November 2016)

With the passing away of Dr. Nicolaas Nobel (Founder of the Tribal Cultural Heritage in India Foundation), India’s tribal communities have lost a true friend and well-wisher:

A Philanthropist With a Difference
This is a loss of a philanthropist with a difference. Dr Nico did not just collect and donate funds for philanthropy but took an active part in ensuring that the funds were indeed well spent by regularly travelling to the field and forming a deep understanding of the local context of the beneficiaries. The Rani Kajal school in Kakrana would not have been what it is today without his thoughtful support. – Rahul Banerjee (anar-kali.blogspot.nl) | More about Nicolaas Nobel >>

nico_kaja_31-5-16_web

Too humble to even want to be credited for his contribution to rural education and health care, ‘Nico’, as he preferred to be called, often spoke of the remarkable people he first befriended during his studies in Oxford, then visited in India on several occasions.

To begin with, it is among the admirers of Indian culture that Nico would want to be remembered. Yet it seems appropriate to also mention the one person whom Nico mentioned most gladly as his source of inspiration: Baba Amte (1914-2008), regarded as compassion personified in India and beyond. His work is being continued by his sons’ families working for the welfare of hundreds of tribal and other rural communities in India’s heartland. Nico not only shared their ideals but actively supported what the rural poor need most: proper education and basic health care.

It is important here to understand what this entails in the context of modern Indian society, namely grassroots work done by doctors, social workers and educators as envisaged by two pioneers active in many fields – both working towards a modern, truly democratic India: Rabindranath Tagore and ‘Mahatma’ Gandhi, whose fervent follower Baba Amte was:

But he [Baba Amte] was definitively influenced by Gandhi’s ideals of simplicity and truth and his fight against injustice. He spent time at Gandhi’s ashram in Sevagram, took part in his movement to get the British to leave India in 1942 and organized lawyers to defend the movement’s jailed leaders. He was also arrested and imprisoned. Seeing grim poverty in and around his father’s large estate, he gave up his lucrative law practice in his early 30s and began working with untouchable sweepers and night soil carriers. […]

Despite having a back ailment later in his life, Mr. Amte took part in long protest marches for causes including environmentalism, religious tolerance, peace and justice. He was a supporter of India’s indigenous tribes and opposed the construction of a “super dam” project on one of India’s largest rivers; it eventually destroyed many villages. […]

Source: Baba Amte, 93, Dies; Advocate for Lepers – The New York Times
Address: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/17/world/asia/17amte.html
Date Visited: Tue Dec 27 2016 18:38:19 GMT+0100 (CET

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Environment minister’s call for a change in the colonial outlook: “Forests, tribal forest dwellers and life forms living in forests complement one another and are not rivals”

Forests, tribals and wildlife are not rivals, says environment minister

Anil Madhav Dave inaugurates two-day conference of senior-level forest officers from states [Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Dehradun]

Rajeshwari Ganesan , Down To Earth,  Friday 21 October 2016  | To read the full article, click here >>

The meeting is aimed at develop mitigation measures for faster green clearances for projects in wildlife habitats

The meeting of state forest secretaries to develop mitigation measures for faster green clearances for projects in wildlife habitats, which began today, saw the environment minister Anil Madhav Dave affirm, “Jungle is a living entity and it also communicates, provided we have the ability to listen to it.”While addressing the forest officials at the two-day conference, he called for a change in the colonial outlook that has existed from the pre-Independence period towards forests, tribal forest dwellers and life forms living in forests.  “The three essential components—forests, tribal forest dwellers and life forms living in forests complement one another and are not rivals,” he said, adding, “Large-scale felling of trees in forests is not being done by tribal forest dwellers.” […]

The official note said that the “central theme of the conference is development without destruction, peoples’ participation, building skills and capacities of the workforce, as well as people dependent on forests and illegal trade in wildlife and timber.” […]

The minister released a book titled ‘Golden Leaves – Celebrating 50 years of Indian Forest Service’ on the occasion.

Related [Down to Earth]

Source: Forests, tribals and wildlife are not rivals, says environment minister
Address: http://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/forests-tribals-and-wildlife-are-not-rivals-dave-56098
Date Visited: Tue Nov 29 2016 20:25:27 GMT+0100 (CET)

Foundation stone of world’s first Natural World Heritage Centre laid at WII

Kavita Upadhyay, The Hindu, Dehradun August 30, 2014

In an unprecedented step towards conservation of natural heritage sites in Asia and the Pacific region, the foundation stone of the world’s first Natural World Heritage Centre was laid at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), in Dehradun on Saturday. […]

“This is UNESCO’s first centre in the world for the conservation of Natural World Heritage,” Dr Mathur said.

Dr Mathur said that the centre would work towards protection and conservation of around 67 Natural World Heritage sites across the 50 countries in Asia and the Pacific region.
Capacity building courses, research for Natural World Heritage protection, and tasks ensuring community participation towards conservation of the natural heritage would be undertaken at the WII centre, Dr Mathur said.

The centre at WII was the result of the Central government’s ‘Request for Action’ submitted to UNESCO in the year 2012 for the establishment of a Centre of Excellence on Natural World Heritage for Asia and the Pacific region at WII. The proposal was approved by UNESCO in November, 2013.

Source: Foundation stone of world’s first Natural World Heritage Centre laid at WII – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/other-states/foundation-stone-of-worlds-first-natural-world-heritage-centre-laid-at-wii/article6365337.ece
Date Visited: Sun Dec 25 2016 12:28:43 GMT+0100 (CET)

About Wildlife Institute of India

Established in 1982, Wildlife Institute of India (WII) is an internationally acclaimed Institution, which offers training program, academic courses and advisory in wildlife research and management. The Institute is actively engaged in research across the breadth of the country on biodiversity related issues.

The Institute’s idyllic campus that has been carefully developed to create state of the art infrastructure encourages scholarly work. […]

Source: Wildlife Institute of India, an Autonomous Institute of MoEF, Govt. of India
Address: https://www.wii.gov.in/
Date Visited: Sun Dec 25 2016 12:18:47 GMT+0100 (CET)

Contact Us

Post Box #18, Chandrabani
Dehradun – 248001
Uttarakhand
India
E-mail: wii@wii.gov.in
Telephone: +91 135 2640114 – 15, 2646100

Source: Contact Us | Wildlife Institute of India, an Autonomous Institute of MoEF, Govt. of India
Address: https://www.wii.gov.in/contact_us
Date Visited: Sun Dec 25 2016 12:20:11 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Posted in Colonial policies, Community facilities, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Forest Rights Act (FRA), Government of India, Maps, Misconceptions, Nature and wildlife, Northern region, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples | Comments Off on Environment minister’s call for a change in the colonial outlook: “Forests, tribal forest dwellers and life forms living in forests complement one another and are not rivals”

The Lakota Elders Project: “A unique generational bridge” – Great Plains of America

Uploaded on Jul 26, 2011

For information about the work of hawkwing, Inc. and how you can help, visit their website at http://www.hawkwing.org.

For information about the production of the Lakota Elders Project, contact Filmosity at http://filmosity.com

Long ago, the Lakota people lived on the Great Plains of America, surviving in the Great Circle, at one with the land and with each other. In those times, the Lakota called themselves Oyate Pte – the Buffalo Nation. Today, many refer to the history of the Lakota people as the “Seven Generational Ages.”

In September 2005, through a collaboration of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Tunxis Community College, and hawkwing, Inc., a camera crew traveled to Eagle Butte, South Dakota to capture the wisdom and experiences of the Cheyenne River Sioux Elders. The goal of the project was to preserve an important part of the Lakota culture for its children.

These Elders hold a unique generational bridge. They studied with their Parents and Grandparents who lived before the time of reservations, when the Lakota were still free people. They hold the last living link to the period “before the white man came,” and with that, an important story.

This film ©2006 Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; hawkwing, Inc.; Tunxis Community College; and Filmosity Productions. All Rights Reserved. For educational purposes only.

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Posted in Assimilation, Colonial policies, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Education and literacy, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Nature and wildlife, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Social conventions, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal elders, Video resources - external, Women, Worship and rituals | Comments Off on The Lakota Elders Project: “A unique generational bridge” – Great Plains of America

On the need for decolonising the colonial construction of Adivasi society: An extensive literature on communities viewed as “distinct societies”

The construction of textual knowledge about Indian communities in the colonial milieu resulted in an extensive literature on almost all communities that was not only used as a source of legal and general administration but also to establish colonial domination. In this process the adivasis of India were constructed apposite to civilised society, therefore a distinct society. Unfortunately, post-colonial scholarship did not decolonise this colonial construction of adivasi society […]

http://www.epw.in/journal/2008/39/special-articles/mapping-adivasi-social-colonial-anthropology-and-adivasis.html

Between Tradition and Modernity

The British colonial state in India ensured that the princely states were picturised as backward enclaves that kept alive an older feudal polity characterised by autocracy and underdevelopment, while British India moved towards modernity and capitalist development. However, the reality was that while the princes appeared superficially to enshrine an exotic Oriental past in their courtly and private life, the general development was carried out on the line of the colonial model. The ideological boundaries between the princely states and British territories were fluid and there was visible cross-pollination between the sociocultural and political issues and movements of the two territories. In fact, the colonial state used a number of methods to produce the effect of colonial power in the princely states. The coastal Andhra ruling class has continued a similar strategy after the formation of Andhra Pradesh state in order to subordinate the people of Telangana.

Source: Between Tradition and Modernity | Economic and Political Weekly
Address: http://www.epw.in/journal/2013/48/special-articles/between-tradition-and-modernity.html
Date Visited: Tue Nov 01 2016 19:33:58 GMT+0100 (CET)

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India’s first Chief Minister from a tribe with many members living in China: The Kaman Mishmi community – Arunachal Pradesh

Rahul Karmakar, Hindustan Times, Guwahati  21 February 2016

Kalikho Pul, the eighth chief minister of Arunachal Pradesh, has a few firsts. He is the first Congress CM in India to be installed with support from arch rivals BJP, and the first from south-eastern Arunachal Pradesh belonging to one of the smallest ethnic groups – Kaman Mishmi.

He is also the first CM with many members of his tribe living in China.

Anjaw, Pul’s home district bordering China, has ethnic groups such as Zakhring whose population is barely 1,000. The Kamans are thrice this number but fewer than the Idus and Digarus, the other two in the greater Mishmi group with an estimated total population of more than 30,000.

Across the border, in southern Tibet, the Kamans are called Geman Dengs. Numbering some 1,500, the Dengs are one of several ethnic groups not recognised by Beijing.

Arunachal Pradesh has 26 major tribes and 100 sub-groups, and among the smallest are the Sherdukpens who practise Buddhism. Prem Khandu Thungon, the state’s first CM from 1975-79, was a member of this community that numbered around 2,000 then. […]

According to the Indigenous Faith and Cultural Society of Arunachal Pradesh, Pul is a minority among minorities on the religious count too. The Kamans follow Amik Matai, an indigenous faith distinct from the Nani Inyata faith of the Idus and Jab Malo of the Digarus.

Adherents of these and other faiths such as Donyi-Polo, Rangfrah and Nyezi-no are 26.2% of the population in Arunachal Pradesh (2011 census), the largest religion being Christianity at 30.26%.

Miniscule nature-worshipping communities are in the true sense India’s minorities, though the term is invariably used for mainstream religious groups,” Assam-based Ramkui Newme, head of an indigenous faith called Heraka, told Hindustan Times.

Some 200,000 Zeliangrongs comprising Zeme, Liangmai and Rongmei Nagas in Assam, Manipur and Nagaland follow Heraka.

Like the Monpas of Tawang, the Kaman Mishmis had borne the brunt of the Chinese attack in the Walong (Anjaw) sector in 1962. Many played the ethnic card – some Chinese soldiers were Mishmis – to save themselves as well as help the Indian army.

Nabam Tuki, the man Pul ousted to become CM, had in 2010 honoured a septuagenarian named Alorno Pul as recognition of his role in saving Indian lives and property in the 1962 war. […]

He also said Mishmis on either side cross the border often to meet up and exchange farm produce.

Source: Kalikho Pul: Arunachal’s ‘minority’ CM with half his tribe in China | india | Hindustan Times
Address: http://www.hindustantimes.com/india/kalikho-pul-arunachal-s-minority-cm-with-half-his-tribe-in-china/story-bzSOfFaxKMkRYhQApQ7n2H.html
Date Visited: Wed Aug 31 2016 19:26:37 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Democracy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, History, Maps, Names and communities, Press snippets, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States, Success story, Worship and rituals | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on India’s first Chief Minister from a tribe with many members living in China: The Kaman Mishmi community – Arunachal Pradesh

Tribal Research and Development Institute (Bhopal): A ‘nodal’ centre in support of tribal culture – Madhya Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan & Chhattisgarh

tribal_rd_instit_bhopal_screensho

Activities

    • The Institute has carried out extensive ethnographic studies on the tribes of Madhya Pradesh and maintains a rich database in its documentation centre.
    • Evaluation and impact assessment studies of schemes of the government related to development and empowerment of the scheduled tribes, are undertaken. The Institute apprises the government of its findings on the above and related issues with suggestions for appropriate policy or implementation change
    • The Institutes undertakes anthropological reference studies. It also furnishes its considered opinion to the government in cases where communities claim to belong to the scheduled tribes.
    • Training is imparted to field level government functionaries to orient and sensitize them regarding the way of life of tribal communities.
    • Seminars and workshops are held to discuss issues relating to the tribes.
    • Dictionaries are under preparation, of Gondi, Korku and Bhili tribal dialects.
    • Fairs and festivals are held from time to time to create awareness of the richness of tribal culture.
    • The Institute maintains a comprehensive library of books, documents, photographs and films relating to the tribes.
  1. Encouragement and facilitation of academic research on tribal issues, partly through implementation of the scheme of Fellowships awarded by the Government of India for doctoral and post doctoral research, is part of the Institute’s programmes.
  2. The Tribal Museums at Bhopal and at Chhindwara showcase a fascinating collection of artifacts. A new museum building is under construction at Bhopal.
  3. The Institute has been declared a Nodal TRI to co-ordinate with the TRIs of Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan and Chhattisgarh states.

Source: Tribal Research and Development Institute
Address: http://www.trdi.mp.gov.in/Activities.asp
Date Visited: Tue Oct 04 2016 15:39:59 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Contact us

Tribal Research & Development Institute
35, Shyamla Hills
Bhopal – 462002, Madhya Pradesh (India)
Tel No : +91 – 755 – 2661259, 2661126, 2661375
Fax No. :+91 – 755 – 2661259(Office), 2661375
email : tribho@nic.in

Source: Tribal Research and Development Institute
Address: http://www.trdi.mp.gov.in/contactUs.asp
Date Visited: Tue Oct 04 2016 15:41:52 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Anthropology, Central region, Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Education and literacy, Government of India, Languages and linguistic heritage, Libraries, Maps, Museum collections - India, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Seasons and festivals | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Tribal Research and Development Institute (Bhopal): A ‘nodal’ centre in support of tribal culture – Madhya Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan & Chhattisgarh

The depiction of Santal culture in modern art: Jamini Roy (National Gallery of Modern Art) – New Delhi

santal_girl_jamini_roy_screenshot_ngma

Screenshot: Santhal Girl by Jamini Roy (1887-1972) | To read the full text and view more images, click here >>

Jamini Roy was one of the earliest and most significant modernists of twentieth century Indian art. From 1920 onwards his search for the essence of form led him to experiment with dramatically different visual style. His career spanning over nearly six decades had many significant turning points and his works collectively speak of the nature of his modernism and the prominent role he played in breaking away from the art practices of his time. […]

In the first few years of the 1920s, Jamini Roy did several paintings in what he called “flat technique.” He had said that like Chinese landscapes, he discarded nonessential details in the backgrounds. The subjects were mostly Santhal women and he brought to the figuration a certain sensuousness. […]

The Bengal School, founded by Abanindranath Tagore and Kala Bhavana in Santiniketan under Nandalal Bose rejected European naturalism and the use of oil as a medium and were exploring new ways of representation. Jamini Roy, too, consciously rejected the style he had mastered during his academic training and from the early 1920s searched for forms that stirred the innermost recesses of his being. He sought inspiration from sources as diverse as East Asian calligraphy, terracotta temple friezes, objects from folk arts and crafts traditions and the like. […]

santal_dance_jamini_roy_screenshot_ngma

Screenshot: Santhal Dance by Jamini Roy
Source: National Portal and Digital Repository: Record Details
Address: http://museumsofindia.gov.in/repository/record/ngma_del-ngma-00158-19
Date Visited: Tue Nov 01 2016 20:06:18 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Posted in Crafts and visual arts, Eastern region, History, Maps, Modernity, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Names and communities, Quotes, Tagore and rural culture, Women | Tagged | Comments Off on The depiction of Santal culture in modern art: Jamini Roy (National Gallery of Modern Art) – New Delhi

Seeking to realize the long cherished dream of higher education among the “custodians of Indian culture”: Indira Gandhi National Tribal University (Amarkatnak) – Madhya Pradesh

The University | To read the full post, click here >>

The Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Amarkantak has been established by an Act of the Parliament of India. It came into existence by the Indira Gandhi National Tribal University Act, 2007 and came into action on July 2008. The jurisdiction of the University extends to the whole country and it is fully funded by the Central Government through the University Grant Commission. The university caters to the tribals’ long cherished dream of higher education.

Aims and Objectives –

The tribal people are rich in cultural heritage and skill of art and craft but they are still marginalized in respect to higher education as well as in other walks of life. Now in the present age of globalization the world has shrunk into a village as the society has advanced in technology. But the tribes, who are the custodians of Indian culture in real sense, are far behind in this race of advancement. In order to rescue them from the present plight, the university has put before itself the following aims and objectives-

  • To provide avenues of education, especially higher education and research facilities primarily for the tribal population of India.
  • To disseminate and advance knowledge by providing instructional and research facilities in tribal art, tradition, culture, language, medicinal systems, customs, forest based economic activities, flora, fauna and advancement in technologies relating to the natural resources of the tribal areas.
  • To collaborate with national and international universities and organizations, especially for undertaking cultural studies and research on tribal communities.
  • To formulate tribal centric development models, publish reports and monographs and to organize conferences and seminars on issues relating to tribes and to provide inputs to policy matters in different spheres.
  • To take appropriate measures for promoting the members of tribal communities capable of managing, administering and looking after their own needs by access to higher education through a university of their own.
  • To disseminate and advance knowledge by providing instructional and research facilities in such other branches of learning as it may deem fit.
  • To take appropriate measures for promoting innovations in teaching learning process in inter-disciplinary studies and researches and to pay special attention to the improvement of social, educational and economic conditions and welfare of the scheduled tribes within the Union of India.

In view of the aims and objectives of the university the major thrust will be on providing more opportunity for the tribes. However, the university is open to all

Source: The University : Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, Amarkatnak
Address: http://www.igntu.ac.in/theuniversity.htm
Date Visited: Fri Dec 09 2016 14:40:41 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Posted in Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Democracy, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Government of India, Health and nutrition, Maps, Modernity, Networking, Organizations, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Success story | Comments Off on Seeking to realize the long cherished dream of higher education among the “custodians of Indian culture”: Indira Gandhi National Tribal University (Amarkatnak) – Madhya Pradesh

Names of tribal communities and their distribution across India: Search the “Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Orders (Amendment) Act, 1956” – Government of India

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Museum exhibitions | Showcasing the life of Chenchus and Lambadas: Heritage Museum (Hyderabad) – Telangana & Andhra Pradesh

Yunus Y. Lasania, The Hindu, HYDERABAD, May 19, 2016 | To read the full article and view more photos, click here >>

From the life of Chenchus and Lambadas living in the State to the kind of lives tribals lead, the museum does a good job in showcasing its artifacts. […]

Source: Museums add to Hyderabad’s appeal – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Hyderabad/museums-add-to-citys-appeal/article8618568.ece
Date Visited: Thu Sep 08 2016 17:23:10 GMT+0200 (CEST)

Discover more possibilities here: Visit a museum collection in India >>

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Posted in Anthropology, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Dress and ornaments, Fashion, Games and leisure time, History, Homes and utensils, Museum collections - India, Names and communities, Northern region, Organizations, Photos and slideshows, Southern region, Tourism, Worship and rituals | Tagged , | Comments Off on Museum exhibitions | Showcasing the life of Chenchus and Lambadas: Heritage Museum (Hyderabad) – Telangana & Andhra Pradesh

Video interview | Magsaysay Awardee Prakash Amte on being a doctor practicing in the remote tribal regions – Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh & Chhatisgarh

Uploaded on Jan 5, 2012

http://inktalks.com What does it take to be a doctor practicing in the remote tribal regions without easy access to proper medicine and technology? What does it take to run an orphanage for rescued animals which may have otherwise ended up as dinner for the local population? What does it take for a regular surgeon to perform cataract operation with just a book as a reference? And least of all, what does it take to be Baba Amte’s son? In this Q&A with INK Curator Lakshmi Pratury, Magsaysay awardee Prakash Amte answers these questions and more.

ABOUT INK: INKtalks are personal narratives that get straight to the heart of issues in 18 minutes or less. We are committed to capturing and sharing breakthrough ideas, inspiring stories and surprising perspectives–for free!

Watch an INKtalk and meet the people who are designing the future–now.

http://INKtalks.com

ABOUT PRAKASH AMTE: Magsaysay Awardee Prakash Amte runs Lok Biradari Prakalp to provide community services to tribal people in rural Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Chhatisgarh. The project has grown into a hospital, residential school and an orphanage for injured wild animals. He heads a rare informal court where adivasis (tribals) from far come out of love and trust that justice will be granted.

Source: Prakash Amte: What it takes to dine with a lion – YouTube
Address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sedcBFV1SAA&list=PLzdZd58fqqOxOCLc54dSP22ddbNP28xw2
Date Visited: Sat Dec 03 2016 22:24:25 GMT+0100 (CET)

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Posted in Adivasi, Central region, Community facilities, Figures, census and other statistics, Gandhian social movement, Health and nutrition, History, Names and communities, Organizations, Quotes, Resources, Rural poverty, Storytelling, Video resources - external | Tagged | Comments Off on Video interview | Magsaysay Awardee Prakash Amte on being a doctor practicing in the remote tribal regions – Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh & Chhatisgarh

Video | Film series on Spectacular India: “The people of Manipur believe that they are the descendants of celestial musicians” – Seven Sister States

Published on Apr 2, 2013

Celestial Dancers of Manipur

Perhaps the finest surviving example of traditions of ‘Bhakti’ in India, is the ‘Raasa Lila’ of Manipur.

Source: ‘Spectacular India’ series film no 10 (Excerpts) – YouTube
Address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOS3A5xbQj4
Date Visited: Sat Dec 03 2016 11:14:59 GMT+0100 (CET)

Madhur Tankha, The Hindu, January 1, 2011 | To read the full article, click here >>

Art historian and film-maker Benoy K. Behl has completed shooting and documentation of the culture of the six North-Eastern States and West Bengal for his series on Doordarshan titled “Spectacular India”. […]

In fact, the people of Manipur believe that they are the descendants of gandharvas, celestial musicians, and they have always sought communion with the divine through music and dance,” says Mr. Behl. […]

The 52 film series also showcases the tribal dances of the North-East states. | To read the full interview with art historian and film-maker Benoy K. Behl, click here >>

Source: Exquisite traditions of the Seven Sisters – NEW DELHI – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-newdelhi/exquisite-traditions-of-the-seven-sisters/article1022221.ece
Date Visited: Tue Oct 04 2016 16:08:26 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Customs, Eastern region, Film, Government of India, History, Maps, Media portrayal, Music and dance, Nature and wildlife, Performing arts, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Seven Sister States, Storytelling, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Video | Film series on Spectacular India: “The people of Manipur believe that they are the descendants of celestial musicians” – Seven Sister States

India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Manipur, Meghalaya & Mizoram

There are 29 states and 7 Union territories in the country. Union Territories are administered by the President through an Administrator appointed by him/her. | Learn more >>

States and Capitals

  1. Madhya Pradesh (Bhopal)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  2. Maharashtra (Mumbai)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  3. Manipur (Imphal)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  4. Meghalaya (Shillong)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>
  5. Mizoram (Aizawl)
    Related posts on www.indiantribalheritage.org >>

Note

Some States and Union Territories may not acknowledge the presence of any community recognized as Scheduled Tribe (ST). Yet people from tribal communities now also reside in metropolitan areas, either as (poor) work migrants such as craftsmen or labourers; or (as in the case of educated Adivasis) as students, researchers and professionals: persons with “tribal roots” yet affiliated with India’s government and private institutions such as banks, the mass media and other major companies. They are bound to be more assimilated, even “invisible”, than those who remain attached to their ancestral lands.

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Posted in Community facilities, Cultural heritage, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Figures, census and other statistics, Government of India, Languages and linguistic heritage, Literature and bibliographies, Maps, Museum collections - India, Organizations, Regions of India, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seven Sister States, Success story, Tips, Tribal identity | Comments Off on India’s tribal cultural heritage: An alphabetical journey – Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Manipur, Meghalaya & Mizoram

Award winning photo | “Gardimalien”, a traditional sacred grove of Bargarh district – Odisha

A traditional sacred grove of Bargarh district Odisha | To view a larger version of this image, click here >>

Koht
India, Odisha, Bargarh, Papanga
Pyhapaiga nimi/nimed
Gardimalien Scared grove
Kirjeldus
“Gardimalien” a traditional sacred grove of Bargarh district of Odisha. This sacred grove is associated with the Bhil tribe of Papanga village of Bargarh district. Jhankar the main priest of the community carryout all the rituals here. Annual ritual is held in the month of December every year, where Jhankar seeking bless for the entire community.
Kuupäev
May 2015
Autor
Antaryami Pradhan

Source: A traditional sacred grove of Bargarh district Odisha – Hiite kuvavõistlus 2016 – Kuvad – Maavalla Koda
Address: http://www.maavald.ee/kuvavoistlused/h/maavalla-hiied-2016/2016/a-traditional-sacred-grove-of-bargarh-district-odisha-2395
Date Visited: Mon Nov 28 2016 21:18:14 GMT+0100 (CET)

A total of 20 prizes are awarded to participants, including special awards for global view, islands, nature and heritage protection, as well as various other categories. The awards include cash prizes as well as a horse-back riding trip, a smoke sauna session, tickets to concerts and workshops, books, etc.

All winning photographs are available at: http://www.maavald.ee/en/news/5093-hiite-kuvavoistluse-voitjad

A total of 170 photographers submitted more than 700 photos to the competition. The youngest participant was 4 and the oldest 82 years old, with skill levels ranging from beginner to world-class. The photos show sacred sites from 31 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and the Americas.

The jury consisted of nature photographer Arne Ader, reporter Helen Arusoo, artist Elo Liiv and anthropologist Svetlana Karm from the Estonian National Museum. Patron of the Sacred Groves Photography Contest is Tõnis Lukas, Director General of the Estonian National Museum.

The aim of the Sacred Groves Photography Contest is to appreciate and record historical natural sacred sites and the natural and cultural heritage surrounding them, and to encourage the public to visit the sites. The competition is organised by the Tartu University Centre for Natural Sacred Sites, Hiite Maja Foundation and Maavalla Koda. The next Sacred Groves Photography Contest will be held in 2017.

Winners will be awarded in the new Estonian National Museum Building in Tartu on 3 December 2016 at 13.00.

Our supporters are: Wiedemanni Translation Bureau, the Kindred Peoples Programme, Eesti Kultuurkapital, Kehrwieder, the Estonian Folklore Archives of the Estonian Literature Museum, the Estonian National Museum, Võro Instituut, Mulgi Kultuuri Instituut, the Võrtsjärve Foundation, Uma Leht, Tihuse Riding-Farm, the Estonian Folklore Council, the Heritage Protection Board, the Environmental Board, Jõgeva County Government, the Estonian Traditional Music Centre, the Krautman Health and Massage Academy, Harmoonikum, Viru Folk, Roheliste Rattaretk, Nature Photo of the Year, Pegasus Press, the School of Traditional Knowledge and Folk Medicine, Mooska Farm, Tagavälja Farm, the Kalevipoja Koda Foundation, the Estonian Printing Museum, Siniallika Inn, Pühaste Brewery, the Hea Lugu publishing house, Farmi Dairy Industries and the LÜÜ-TÜRR Men’s Folkloric Song Ensemble.

Sacred Groves Photography Contest 2016 all photos:
http://www.maavald.ee/en/image-contests/2016

All winning photographs are available at:
http://www.maavald.ee/en/news/5093-hiite-kuvavoistluse-voitjad

Source: email from Ahto Kaasik <ahto@hiis.ee> dated 28 November 2016
Re: “Sacred Natural Sites Photo Contest Winners Announced”

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The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

Golden Orb Web Spider, Nephila maculata, Giant Wood Spider

World distribution: Tropical areas from Africa, India, China, Japan across Southeast Asia to Northern Australia and the South Pacific islands.

By Ria Tan, 2001 | To view more photos and read more by the same author, click here >>

Webs of steel: The Golden Orb Web Spider is not the largest spider, but makes the largest and strongest web. It gets its name from the golden colour of its silk. […]

Tribal people have long used the webs of these spiders. In the South Pacific, the web silk is used to make fishing lures, traps and nets. In the Solomon Islands, the spider web is collected by winding it around sticks to make large sticky balls which are suspended just above the water. Needle fish are lured to jump out and get entangled in the ball. In Southeast Asia, people make a net by scooping up the web between a stick bent into a loop. Spider webs have been used as bandage to stop blood flow and used to make bird snares.

In modern times, the Golden Orb Web Spider’s silk is set to become a major product. The silk is almost as strong as Kevlar, the strongest man-made material which is drawn from concentrated sulphuric acid. In contrast, spider silk is drawn from water. If we could manufacture spider silk, it would have a million uses from parachutes, bullet-proof vests, lightweight clothing, seatbelts, light but strong ropes, as sutures in operations, artificial tendons and ligaments. Studies are now being done to have genetically engineered plants produce fluid polymers which can be processed into silk! […]

Source: golden orb web spider (nephila spp.): info fact sheets, photos
Address: http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/inverts/nephila.htm
Date Visited: Mon Apr 25 2016 19:06:39 GMT+0200 (CEST)

spiders_giant_tiny_gg_thattekad_2014

Photo credit: girish-galibore-thattekad – to enlarge and for more information, click on the image

Giant wood spider (Nephila pilipes), note the tiny male dwarfed by the massive female

Trip:       Thattekad
Camp:   Periyar River Lodge
Dates:   14-16 Nov ‘14

Source: November | 2014 | Wilderness Notes
Address: https://badrikrishnan.com/2014/11/
Date Visited: Sat Nov 26 2016 13:59:52 GMT+0100 (CET)

 

The Western Ghats lie roughly parallel to the west coast of India (Wikipedia) – click on the map for more information

Madhav Gadgil & Ligia Noronha, The Hindu (Opinion), May 2, 2013

This is a challenging time in India’s development history where a number of tenets of environmental governance are being questioned by the imperative of growth. Environmental governance in India is under assault, and is thus in need of both fresh thinking, and a new focus, based on outcome and results.

The Western Ghats are no ordinary ecosystem. They constitute the water tower of peninsular India, providing water to 245 million people and draining a large part of the land surface of India. They are also a treasure trove of biodiversity. The Convention on Biological Diversity confers sovereign rights over these elements of biodiversity for which we are a country of origin. India can play an important role in research relating to such biodiversity elements and claim a share in the commercial profits flowing out of their use. The elements of value not only include medicinal plants and cultivated species of plants and their wild relatives, but seemingly worthless creations such as spider cobwebs, which turn out to be sources of a new kind of silk stronger than steel. Notably enough, such elements of value are by no means confined to natural forests, but occur everywhere across the Western Ghats, underscoring the need to maintain connectivity amongst biodiversity rich habitats. […]

Source: An ecosystem to save, or squander – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/an-ecosystem-to-save-or-squander/article4674200.ece
Date Visited: Mon Apr 25 2016 19:24:46 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Accountability, Commentary, Customs, Ecology and environment, Economy and development, History, Maps, Modernity, Nature and wildlife, Photos and slideshows, Press snippets, Quotes, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Western Ghats - tribal heritage & ecology | Comments Off on The world’s largest and strongest spiderweb: Long used by tribal people and “set to become a major product” – Western Ghats

Araku Tribal Museum: “Like being in the world of local tribes” – Andhra Pradesh

Anuradha Goyal, January 27, 2014 | To read the full description, click here >>

Araku Tribal Museum is located in Araku, a small town in the valley surrounded by hills and many waterfalls, about 110 km’s from Visakhapatnam. What makes Araku Valley Tribal museum stand out is its very structure which is indigenous, absolutely native, right from the architecture, to the material used, to colors and contours. […]

Musical Instruments, Masks, Pottery, Paintings at Araku Tribal Museum.

Step inside and it is like being in the world of local tribes. You see the setting of their homes with dioramas depicting day-to-day activities. There are scenes from market and dances from various festivals. A small board explains the tribe and scene. The walls were full of masks and there was a scene depicting makeup being done for the drama. Musical instruments, clay pottery and walls paintings with local motifs keep the eyes engaged. […]

I definitely recommend this museum to anyone visiting Araku Valley. A trip to Araku Valley is a weekend get away from Visakhapatnam.

Source: Araku Tribal Museum – Places To Visit In Araku Valley
Address: http://www.inditales.com/araku-tribal-museum/
Date Visited: Mon Oct 24 2016 15:41:29 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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Posted in Anthropology, Community facilities, Crafts and visual arts, Cultural heritage, Customs, Homes and utensils, Museum collections - India, Music and dance, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Southern region, Success story | Comments Off on Araku Tribal Museum: “Like being in the world of local tribes” – Andhra Pradesh