A young state committed to the development of its tribal communities – Telangana

About Telangana Tribals

After the formation of the new State of Telangana on the 2nd June, 2014, the State Government has attached top-most priority for the development of Scheduled Tribe population in the State, which accounts for 9.34 per cent of the total population (as per 2011 census), which is significantly higher compared to the percentage of 6.99 STs in the combined State of AP. Many innovative schemes like Kalyana Lakshmi for financial assistance to ST girls of marriageable age have been planned by the Tribal Welfare Department.

Published on Oct 17, 2015

With a view to alleviate financial distress in the families of Scheduled Tribes, the Government launched an innovative scheme called “Kalyana Lakshmi” under which financial assistance of Rs.51,000/- shall be paid to every ST unmarried girl of 18 years and above age at the time of marriage which parental income shall not exceed Rs.2.00lakhs per annum. Further, to ensure uninterrupted release of funds, the scheme has been included under Green Channel.

Summit of achievement: Doodi Bhadraiah was part of Transcend Adventures International Mount Everest, Hyderabad. — PHoto: By Arrangement

B.V.S. Bhaskar, The Hindu, CHINTURU (A.P.) / MOUNT EVEREST CAMP:, May 21, 2016

Doodi Bhadraiah, a tribal youth, has created a record of sorts by climbing world’s highest mount — the Everest — on Friday, and he is first tribal lad from Andhra Pradesh to achieve the feat — after bifurcation.

He is part of the Transcend Adventures International Mount Everest, Hyderabad, a professional unit led by Arjun awardee Sekhar Babu Bachinepally. This year, Mr. Babu took eight others along with Bhadraiah to the expedition. The ‘Koya’ lad is from of Kothapalli village in Chinturu mandal, which was merged into East Godavari district of Andhra Pradesh from Khammam district in Telangana. | To read the full article, click here >>

Source: ‘Koya’ youth climbs Everest, creates record – The Hindu
Address: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/andhra-pradesh/koya-youth-climbs-everest-creates-record/article8627798.ece
Date Visited: Sun Jun 11 2017 19:27:57 GMT+0200 (CEST)

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A day to “share the full story”: Indigenous Peoples Day on Turtle Island – United States

Today across Turtle Island (also known as the United States), millions are celebrating the resiliency within themselves and within their communities. They are celebrating and honoring those that came before them and those that will come after them. They are celebrating perseverance and determination. They are celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day.
As of this year 19 cities including Los Angeles, Austin, and Salt Lake City, have joined the 36 cities across the county who already recognize Indigenous Peoples Day rather than Columbus day. […]

In honor of uplifting Indigenous voices and stories, Indigenous Rising Media would like to feature 7 Indigenous activists, educators, entrepreneurs that you should be following!

They share with us what they are protecting and defending, in honor of their own resilience and the resilience of their ancestors.
Check them out, support, and share! >>

Lyla June: Honoring Indigenous Peoples Day gives us a chance to educate ourselves about hidden histories and distortions of history. It also helps us see that what is now known at the United States, has a tradition of glorifying conquest in ways that do not ring true for much of the present generation. This is not who we want to be anymore as a collective of humans living on this sacred land. This goes for not only native Americans, but many non-natives as well. […]

Lyla June Johnston, Diné/Cheyenne. To support Lyla and learn more about her work, follow this link: https://www.facebook.com/lylajune/. Instragram: lylajune

Source: 7 Indigenous Voices You Need to Know About on this Indigenous Peoples Day
Indigenous Rising MediaOct 9 (accessed 16 October 2017)

Use the WorldCat.org search field seen here for authors, names or titles dealing with the above mentioned issues (e.g. „turtle island indigenous“):

Search for an item in libraries near you:
WorldCat.org >>
Posted in Colonial policies, Commentary, Cultural heritage, Customs, De- and re-tribalisation, Democracy, Ecology and environment, Endangered language, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Modernity, Names and communities, Networking, Photos and slideshows, Quotes, Revival of traditions, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Seasons and festivals, Storytelling, Success story, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity | Comments Off on A day to “share the full story”: Indigenous Peoples Day on Turtle Island – United States

Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative: Conference report – New Delhi

“Tribes In Transition-II: Reaffirming Indigenous Identity Through Narrative”

Report for the ICSSR-sponsored Two-Day National Conference organised by The Department of English & Outreach Programme Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi on 27-28 February 2017

Read or download the full report: Final Report Tribes in Transition-2-web  (printfriendly PDF, 560 KB) >>

Concept Note:

The term “tribe” – used synonymously today with other terms like “indigenous”, “aboriginal”, “Adivasi” and “First Nations people” – has a long history that connects diverse communities across the world on the basis of their common worldview. Beginning as part of the colonial vocabulary of administration, the term “tribe” had constructed such communities in terms of the western dichotomy between the civilized and the primitive, and had viewed them either as primitive savages hostile to civilization or as peripheral beings who lived in a primeval world that becomes an idealized site for an alternative culture. In later years, many creative representations of them in literature, art and narrative cinema had perpetrated these stereotypes, though the motivations behind them may have been different. In more recent times, some writers have invoked the existence of the Fourth World, composed of the world’s indigenous people, whose history and ecology have been appropriated by the other two Worlds.

In post-Independence India, there has been a great deal of what the anthropologists call “culture contact”, resulting in acculturation, displacement and other related changes among the tribal peoples. These changes have triggered aggressive political movements among some tribal groups, sometimes closely aligned with non-tribal ideological elements, which have led to new and experimental narrative forms.

In the wake of globalization and heavy industrialization, the tribal people of India have been struggling with a growing sense of Angst, at various levels. A direct result of migration and acculturation is seen in the rapid erosion faced by many tribal languages today – an erosion that could lead to the loss of unique knowledge systems and oral traditions transmitted through these languages for centuries. The Centre for Oral & Tribal Literature, Sahitya Akademi, New Delhi, is working towards the preservation of India’s tribal cultural heritage by collecting, documenting and translating the different genres of tribal folklore, particularly their creation myths. By bringing together tribal storytellers, writers and cultural artistes to a common platform with research scholars from Literature, Linguistics, History, Sociology and Anthropology (among others), the proposed Conference will contribute to this monumental task being undertaken by Sahitya Akademi.

Objectives:

While grappling with the issues of tribal and indigenous identity, culture, history and narrative, the Conference will address relevant questions such as: What is the outcome of the interface between oral tradition and modernity? What is ‘tribal imagination’? What is the tribal sense of history? How can tribal oral traditions be preserved in the digital age? How does contemporary tribal literature compare/ contrast with the traditional genres? Why do tribal and indigenous narratives suffer from low visibility within mainstream academia? What is the significance of tribal and indigenous characters in mainstream narratives? How does the perspective of the ‘outsider’ differ from that of the ‘insider’? Finally, the Conference will try to connect with grassroots workers and activists working on problems of healthcare, education, employment and human trafficking among the tribal and indigenous communities of India.

Important Sub-themes of the Conference:

  • Oral tradition and modernity
  • Tribal memory and imagination
  • Tribal art forms and aesthetics
  • Tribal versions of the Indian epics
  • Script movements among tribal groups
  • Endangered oral languages
  • Tribal resistance narratives
  • Approaches to tribal healthcare
  • Tribal education and employability
  • Human trafficking in tribal areas

Contribution to Existing Research:

The Conference will add a multidisciplinary approach to the existing research on tribal/ indigenous communities in India. While the conventional areas within the disciplines of Literature, Linguistics, History, Sociology and Anthropology will dominate the discourse, new areas from Cultural Studies, Folklore Studies, Film Studies, Art and Aesthetics etc, will also be introduced. Finally, it is hoped that by critiquing existing approaches to tribal healthcare and education in India, the Conference will lay the groundwork for some much-needed changes in government policy towards the Scheduled Tribes.

Source: Courtesy Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 4 October 2017)

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Invitation to the Santali Literary Meet: “Santal Onolia Helmel” (Dumka, 20-21 October 2017) – Jharkhand

santal_literary_meet2017

Source: Courtesy Dr. Ivy Hansdak, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Jamia Millia Islamia University New Delhi (email 9 October 2017)

JAGWAR-III
SANTAL LITERARY MEET: SANTAL ONOLIA HELMEL 2017
“Santali Literature & Society in the Changing World”
Johar HRD Centre, Dumka, Jharkhand, India
20 – 21 October, 2017

Concept Note

“The more things change, the more things remain the same.”

In the wake of globalization and heavy industrialization, the tribal people of India have been struggling with a growing sense of Angst at various levels. A direct result of migration and acculturation is seen in the rapid erosion faced by many tribal languages – erosion that could lead to loss of unique knowledge systems and oral traditions transmitted through these oral languages for generations. This Angst of the tribal people is reflected in the literary, linguistic, political and socio-economic fields, and need to be studied since they are reflections of seismic changes sweeping across the world.

This Seminar will deal with continuity and change within Santal society, in the context of modernity, globalization and digitalization. It was earlier thought that oral narratives like myths, folktales, folksongs, fables, riddles etc, died away under the impact of globalization. This view is no longer acceptable since it is found that many oral narratives live on in other forms of modern mass media. Popular heroes on television and cinema are often based on the roles played by traditional heroes in oral stories. Hence, mass media may have changed the boundaries of entertainment but it has not erased the contents. The important sub-themes of the Seminar will be:

  • Santal history, memory and imagination
  • Santal oral tradition and modernity
  • Santal resistance narratives
  • Santal art and aesthetics
  • Multiple scripts of Santali
  • Santal model of development
  • Santal women’s empowerment

Registration Fee: Rs. 200/- (Rs. 50/- for students)

CONVENER: Dr. Ivy Imogene Hansdak
Ph. No: 8505895533; Email: ivyihansdak@gmail.com

CO-CONVENER: Mr. Innocent Soren
Ph. No: 9432261200; innocentsoren@hotmail.com

COORDINATOR: Mr. Sunder Manoj Hembrom
Ph. No: 9903695055; Email: smanoj0876@gmail.com

CHIEF HOST: Fr. David Solomon SJ
Ph. No: 8757690775; Email: solojohar@gmail.com

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“Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?”: Questions debated among members of 565 recognized American Indian tribes

by Dennis Zotigh January 26, 2011 | Read the full post in Beyond FAQ: Let’s talk >>

My answer? There are many definitions of who is an Indian. As a starting point, “Indian” is a misguided label that spread through Europe after 1492. Native people have always associated themselves with their tribe(s) and referenced their tribal names in their tribal languages. Explorers and colonists from Spain, France, England, the Netherlands, and Russia, among other countries, began naming tribes they encountered in North America in European languages. As English became the primary language in the United States, American Indian (to distinguish us from Indians native to India) became the collective term used.

American Indians generally belong to or are descendants of tribes indigenous to what is now the United States.

In modern times the federal government, states, tribes and individuals have formed their own definitions of who is Indian. Three important criteria to consider when answering this question are federal legal definitions, ethnological Indian ancestry, and tribal membership. The federal government lists 565 federally recognized American Indian tribes and Alaskan Native Communities. Twenty-two states also have criteria for recognizing tribes within their boundaries. The majority of state-recognized tribes, however, are not federally recognized. For United States Census purposes, an individual simply needs to self identify themselves as American Indian and Alaskan Native to be counted in the final summary.

The question of who is an Indian is often debated among Indian people. […]

Skin color does not make you Indian. In our museum I have heard non-Indians comment they have seen an Indian simply if the person they saw has the long black hair, brown skin, and high cheek bones associated with the classic Indian image. In reality, there are proud Indians with blonde hair and blue eyes or black skin. Through intermarriage, their Indian descent comes from one or both Indian parents.

Each tribe has the sovereign authority to define who its members are and who is eligible to be enrolled. […]

Ultimately the question, “Who is an Indian?” is determined by tribal law.

Source: Who is Indian, and what makes a person an Indian?
Address: http://blog.nmai.si.edu/main/2011/01/who-is-indian-and-what-makes-a-person-an-indian.html
Date Visited: Sun Aug 27 2017 17:15:33 GMT+0200 (CEST)

NMAI-Smithsonian-Screenshot-27-8-17

About the Museum

A diverse and multifaceted cultural and educational enterprise, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is an active and visible component of the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s largest museum complex. The NMAI cares for one of the world’s most expansive collections of Native artifacts, including objects, photographs, archives, and media covering the entire Western Hemisphere, from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego.

 The National Museum of the American Indian operates three facilities. The museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., offers exhibition galleries and spaces for performances, lectures and symposia, research, and education. The George Gustav Heye Center (GGHC) in New York City houses exhibitions, research, educational activities, and performing arts programs. The Cultural Resources Center (CRC) in Suitland, Maryland, houses the museum’s collections as well as the conservation, repatriation, and digital imaging programs, and research facilities. The NMAI’s off-site outreach efforts, often referred to as the “fourth museum,” include websites, traveling exhibitions, and community programs.

Since the passage of its enabling legislation in 1989 (amended in 1996), the NMAI has been steadfastly committed to bringing Native voices to what the museum writes and presents, whether on-site at one of the three NMAI venues, through the museum’s publications, or via the Internet. The NMAI is also dedicated to acting as a resource for the hemisphere’s Native communities and to serving the greater public as an honest and thoughtful conduit to Native cultures—present and past—in all their richness, depth, and diversity.

Source: About the Museum | National Museum of the American Indian
Address: http://www.nmai.si.edu/about/
Date Visited: Sun Aug 27 2017 17:18:26 GMT+0200 (CEST)

[Bold typeface added above for emphasis]

An insider’s view on the causes and effects of America’s “Indian problem”:

The white man does not understand the Indian for the reason that he does not understand America. He is too far removed from its formative processes. […]

The attempted transformation of the Indian by the white man and the chaos that has resulted are but the fruits of the white man’s disobedience of a fundamental and spiritual law. The pressure that has been brought to bear upon the native people, since the cessation of armed conflict, in the attempt to force conformity of custom and habit has caused a reaction more destructive than war, and the injury has not only affected the Indian, but has extended to the white population as well. Tyranny, stupidity, and lack of vision have brought about the situation now alluded to as the ‘Indian problem’.

There is, I insist, no Indian problem as created by the Indian himself. 

Source: “What the Indian Means to America”, excerpted from Land of the Spotted Eagle by Luther Standing Bear (who “became hereditary chief of the Oglala Sioux in 1905”) in The Mammoth Book of Native Americans: the Story of America’s original inhabitants in all its beauty, magic, truth and tragedy by Jon E. Lewis (ed.), London: Constable & Robinson Ltd.: 2004 (pp. 348-9) | More details on worldcat.org >>

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