Category Archives: Commentary

The crisis within by G.N. Devy (Book review): “Nearly one in every twelve humans is a young Indian for whom meaningful education is of critical importance”

Book Review by Namrata (June 24, 2017): The crisis within by G.N. Devy Introduction ISBN: 978-93-83064-10-6 Genre: Non-Fiction/ Economics Publishers: Aleph Publishers Price: Rs. 399/-  ( I got the book for review from the publisher) Nearly one in every twelve … Continue reading

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Towards self-dependence: Culture and development-oriented research of indigenous crops – Telangana

The Hindu, 29 June 2017 “Mallapur was an excellent case study as people here had achieved self-dependence so far as food is concerned through cultivation of indigenous crops,” Ms. Vemula, whose husband worked in Adilabad as Agriculture Officer, disclosed as … Continue reading

Posted in Adivasi, Anthropology, Commentary, Customs, Economy and development, Education and literacy, Health and nutrition, Maps, Names and communities, Networking, Press snippets, Revival of traditions, Southern region, Success story, Tribal elders | Tagged | Comments Off on Towards self-dependence: Culture and development-oriented research of indigenous crops – Telangana

Indigenous peoples in the modern world: A call to end colonial misconceptions and racial stereotyping – National Museum of the American Indian

In the Washington Post [22 November 2017], Kevin Gover, director of the museum, deals with five popular misconceptions about Native America | Read the full story here >> Thanksgiving recalls for many people a meal between European colonists and indigenous Americans … Continue reading

Posted in Adverse inclusion, Anthropology, Assimilation, Childhood and children, Colonial policies, Commentary, Constitution and Supreme Court, Cultural heritage, Customs, Democracy, Dress and ornaments, Economy and development, Figures, census and other statistics, History, Languages and linguistic heritage, Media portrayal, Misconceptions, Modernity, Museum collections - general, Names and communities, Organizations, Press snippets, Quotes, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Storytelling, Topics and issues, Tribal culture worldwide, Tribal identity, Video resources - external | Comments Off on Indigenous peoples in the modern world: A call to end colonial misconceptions and racial stereotyping – National Museum of the American Indian

Audio | Who should be telling Indigenous stories? – Canada

Read the full post >> The books, Who Took My Sister? by Shannon Webb-Campbell and In Case I Go by Angie Abdou, have both sparked conversations of who should be telling Indigenous stories, and when to ask for permission. […] Often, before authors write about Indigenous … Continue reading

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Audio | On the need to think harder about the living relatives of indigenous people and not simply treat their human remains as “artifacts”.

Listen to the full interviews from 19:00 on BBC RADIO 4, 3 May 2018 >> The speed of discovery is mesmerizing […] Who owns ancient DNA? A recent article in the journal Science argues that we need to think harder … Continue reading

Posted in Accountability, Anthropology, Archaeology, Audio resources - external, Commentary, Literature and bibliographies, Misconceptions, Quotes, Resources, Rights of Indigenous Peoples | Comments Off on Audio | On the need to think harder about the living relatives of indigenous people and not simply treat their human remains as “artifacts”.